YpsoPump® receives Health Canada Approval

ypsoPump Diabetes Advocacy

Ypsomed Diabetes Care recently announced that their insulin pump YpsoPump® has been approved for sale in Canada and is now available for purchase. Here are a few things that we know about the YpsoPump®.

Who is Ypsomed?

Ypsomed is a Swiss company with a long history of involvement in area of diabetes devices. twicediabetes.com states that they were behind the Disentronic insulin pumps that were available between the 1980s and early 2000s.

According to Ypsomed Diabetes Care “Ypsomed has set itself the goal of making medical self-treatment a matter of routine for people with diabetes. This is why the development team of the YpsoPump had your needs in mind. The result is an insulin pump which focuses on the essential functions and is easy to handle. It features the best of 30 years Swiss medical device engineering.”

How big is the YpsoPump®?

According to the Ypsomed Diabetes Care website, the YpsoPump® measures 7.8 cm × 4.6 cm × 1.6 cm and weighs 83 g (including battery and filled cartridge).

In comparison, the Medtronic ® 670G measures 5.3cm x 9.6cm x 2.4cm and weighs 85g.  The Tandem t:slimX2® is 7.95 cm x 5.08 cm x 1.52 cm and weighs 112g.  The OmniPod system includes the OmniPod is  4cm x 6cm x 1.8cm and weighs 34 g with a filled pod.  The PDM is 6.35cm x 11.4cm x 2.2cm and weighs 125g.

What are some of the key features of the YpsoPump®?

The YpsoPump® is marketed as an “easy to learn” insulin pump offering the “essential features”. 

Ypsopump insulin to carb screen

The features that we have seen include:

  • 4.1 × 1.6 cm, OLED touch screen that uses icons to help you navigate the insulin pump options
  • Pre-filled, 1.6mL (160 unit) glass cartridges that will last for 7 days in the insulin pump or up to 30 days if filled and kept in the refrigerator
  • Waterproof rating of IPX8 (immersion to a depth of 1 m for up to 60 minutes)
  • Bolus delivery in increments of 0.1, 0.5, 1 or 2 units
  • 2 custom basal patterns set in increments of .01 units by the hour
  • Temporary basal patterns that can be set at 0%-200% for 15 min to up 24 hours.  They must be set in 10% increments.
  • Uses one AAA alkaline battery that lasts for 30 days
  • Mylife mobile app for smartphones that sync with the YpsoPump® via Bluetooth® technology.

Mylife Mobile app

YpsoPump

The Mylife app can be downloaded for both iOS and Android. From this app you will be able to customize screens and setting for your YpsoPump®. This is also where the carb calculator and insulin on board will live. You will not find these options on the insulin pump itself.

Ypsomed log book

This app does not currently speak to the insulin pump. This means that once calculations are done on the Mylife app, they must be manually input into your insulin pump.

The Mylife app also has a great looking built-in log book. You will be able to enter data from activities as well as bg levels and carb counts in one spot to analyze.

Does it have a Continuous Glucose Monitor?

At the moment, the YpsoPump® does not work with any CGM or flash technology.  It has been suggested that Ypsomed Diabetes Care is in talks with the key players and plan to add this technology in the future.

What will the YpsoPump® cost?

The regular retail cost of this pump will be $6400. YpsoMed is currently working with all provinces to have their insulin pump added to provincial programs but at the moment, it is not covered.

YposMed’s introductory offer

The YpsoPump® pump will be offered for free to existing pumpers who apply to switch to the YpsoPump ® between July 8 and September 30th, 2019. You will be required to purchase three months supply of both insulin cartridges and infusion sets at the time of purchase. This will be in addition to the free supplies that will come with your pump start.

If your pump warranty has expired, you’ll receive a 1-year warranty on your YpsoPump ®. If your insulin pump hasn’t expired, your warranty will last until 5 years from the purchase date of your new pump. 

You can contact YposMed Canada for more details.

What does it mean for people with diabetes?

four insulin pump choices Diabetes Advocacy

Choosing an insulin pump is personal.  The pump must fit your lifestyle and your needs.  The fact that there is now a fourth option for people with insulin-dependent diabetes is wonderful. 

If you are considering insulin pump therapy or are wondering if you should change from your current insulin pump, remember to shop around. Meet with all of the insulin pump reps and find the best fit for you.  Our ebook on choosing an insulin pump can help you to figure out which features are important to you and give you ideas of questions to ask the representatives that you speak to.

10 things you need to know before shopping for an insulin pump

buying a pump

Insulin pump shopping for the first time can be exciting and daunting.  Whether you have been using insulin for years or are newly diagnosed, you have most likely heard all sorts of good…and bad things about insulin pumps.  As you begin your research to find the best insulin pump for you, you quickly find yourself in wading in a foreign language.  Let us translate some of the things you need to know when shopping for an insulin pump.

What is a basal rate?

One of the first terms that you hear is “basal rate”.  This is your background insulin.  It will replace the long-lasting insulin that you are currently using.  On injections, you inject a set amount of insulin into your body once or twice per day. 

With an insulin pump, you will set basal rates that will deliver that insulin in tiny amounts throughout the day.  These amounts can be extremely small or they can be larger depending on age, insulin sensitivity, and other factors that your diabetes team will help you with.

To give you a rough idea of what your basal needs will be, total up all of the long-acting insulin that you use in a 24-hour period.  Take that amount and divide it by 24.  This will give you a base idea of what you will require. 

A child who is only using 12 units of background insulin would need basal rates of at least .5 units per hour (and perhaps smaller).  An adult who is currently injecting 36 units per day would not be as concerned about small basal rates. Again, your exact rates will be set with the help of your diabetes team but this will help you to understand if you need to be concerned about smaller or larger rates.

What does it mean to bolus?

Another thing that you will often hear is the term “bolus”. That is the amount of insulin that is used to cover meals and correct high blood sugars.  If you have been on multiple injection therapy, this is the amount of rapid-acting insulin that you have been using.

For children, there is often a need for very small bolus amounts.  They might require .05 of a unit or less so small bolus rates are vital. In the case of teens, there can be a need for much larger bolus dosing.

Can you change the bolus delivery rate?

Large bolus dosing leads us to our next term–rate of delivery or delivery speed.  If you require larger amounts of insulin at one sitting (think pizza or pasta meal), you may prefer an insulin pump that will deliver the bolus to you at a slower speed rather than all at once.  Some people experience discomfort with large bolus amounts. 

Remember that your diabetes may vary so what is important for one person may not be a concern for another. Choice is important!

Do you want to be attached to your insulin pump 24/7?

insulin pump

Some people are okay with a tubed insulin pump.  They may even feel comforted by its presence.  Other people hate being attached to something.  You have to decide which you prefer—infusion sets and tubing or a patch insulin pump and PDM. 

How much insulin will you use over three days?

Insulin pumps require that you fill your pod/cartridge/reservoir with insulin on a regular basis. Pods currently hold 200 units of insulin. The Medtronic 670G and the Tandem t:slimX2 both hold 300 units.

Some people are okay with changing cartridges and infusion sets at different times, others want to do it at the same time. Either way, if you are using larger amounts of insulin, you may want to consider a larger insulin container.

Will you be using a continuous glucose monitor?

A Continuous Glucose Monitor or CGM is a device that constantly monitors your blood sugar levels.  If you are already using a system, you may want to know if it works with an insulin pump. Stand alone devices can be used in conjunction with the insulin pump of your choice but only specific brands “speak” to specific pumps at this time. Right now, the t:slim™X2 works with a Dexcom® system.  The 670G works with the Medtronic® Elite system.  If you are using the Libre™ Flash Monitoring system, there is currently no insulin pump that links directly to this device.

What is your body type?

infusion sets

Are you thin or do you have a bit of extra body fat? Are you athletic or pregnant? All of these questions are important when deciding on the best infusion set to use with your new insulin pump. 

Each pump company has their own names for the various infusion sets but infusion sets basically fall into three categories.  There are sites that go straight in (90-degree sites).  There are infusion sets that can be placed on an angle up to 30 degrees. Finally, there are 90-degree steel infusion sets.  Each infusion set works best with a specific body type. Make sure to discuss these options with your diabetes educator or pump trainer.

It is important to consider if you will need a certain type of infusion set before you purchase an insulin pump. Not all pumps currently allow you access to all types of infusion sets.  Because you will be wearing your site 24/7, you want to make sure that you have the most comfortable fit for your body type and lifestyle.

Are you visually impaired in any way?

The lighting of the screen and its font size can be something to consider when choosing the right insulin pump.  They can have a touch screen, a touch bolus or physical buttons that have to be pressed to deliver insulin and change settings.  It is important for you to feel comfortable with which ever option your insulin pump has.  You want to be able to view it in all lighting situations including when responding to those 3 am alarms.

Do you need to lock your pump?

Will the insulin pump be used on a small child? If so, you may want to ensure that you can lock them out of the insulin pump settings.  Buttons and touch screens are often relatively easy to use but you don’t want small children to be able to easily access their touch bolus and accidentally deliver insulin unsupervised.

What are the payment options?

If you don’t have private or public insurance coverage for your insulin pump, you will want to discuss payment options with your rep.  Do they have a payment plan? How does the plan work?

If you have insurance, will they work with your insurance company on your behalf or will you have to be the go-between?

diabetes costs

Purchasing an insulin pump is a huge decision. It is important that you understand the key feature before you begin your search. 

Diabetes Advocacy has helped to make this a little easier for you by creating a 20-page ebook with all of the above questions and more.  This downloadable document gives you things to think about before you purchase your insulin pump as well as prompts to ask your pump rep at your first meeting.

pump book

An insulin pump is a long-term commitment. You will be with your pump 24/7 for the next 4-5 years. It is important that it fits your needs and your lifestyle.

Take me to the insulin pump ebook.

It is NOT an artificial pancreas

My rant…

The media has been shouting for a while now about the new “artificial pancreas” on the market.  This is driving me crazy.  It is not an artificial pancreas. It is a new insulin pump.  This new pump has some automated features but it does not completely replace a pancreas that is not producing insulin. It does not bolus for food on its own.  It is not a cure. What this new device is is a new device! It is another tool to help people living with diabetes live a better life.  That is it!

Medtronic® does not call their latest insulin pump an artificial pancreas. They simply refer to it as “The world’s first self-adjusting insulin pump system for people with type 1 diabetes” (over 7 years of age).  That is fair.

In auto-mode, this new pump will make adjustments and suspend itself.  It uses information from the continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to predict rises and falls in blood glucose levels. The 670G (this self-adjusting insulin pump) will get your background insulin (your basal rate) under control for you.  In turn, “the sensor must be calibrated at a minimum of every 12 hours throughout the life of the sensor. For better sensor performance, it is recommended that you calibrate your sensor three or four times each day.” (page 216 of users manual).  The manual also notes that “the Auto Mode feature still requires your input for meals, calibrations, and times when you need the target value raised.” (page 231).  Again, making this is not a true “artificial pancreas” but a new tool for people with insulin-dependent diabetes.

not an artificial pancreas
It’s just a new tool!

This is great! I am seriously all for better tools.  I am also all for choice as you can read here and here.  I even have developed a tool to help you make your own choices when it comes to purchasing an insulin pump here.

Choice is vital because everyone’s diabetes is different. Children have different needs from teens. Teens have different needs from adults. One adult requires different things from an insulin pump than another does. The good news though is that more choice is coming…or in some countries it is already here.

insulin pumps

In the US, besides the Medtronic® 670G, you have the option to use the t:slim X2™ with Basal IQ™ (this option is available in countries where the t:slim X2™ is sold and the Dexcom® G6 is approved for use). This pump also has a great automated feature. 

It predicts low blood glucose levels ahead of time and stops insulin delivery.  The Basal IQ™ technology will allow the insulin pump to turn insulin delivery on and off as often as every 5 minutes.  As I noted, this system works with the Dexcom® G6 Continuous Glucose Monitor which is currently the only CGM approved for use without the need for fingerstick calibration.  

These systems have been approved for use in the US and other countries. There are other projects that are still being tested like the iLet® project out of the University of Boston.  Bigfoot Biomedical® is working on some exciting projects and patients are creating their own closed loop in the #WeAreNotWaiting projects.

The world of diabetes management tools is once again expanding at a fascinating rate. It is an exciting time.

We are not however at a time when diabetes is cured with an artificial pancreas.  No system counts carbs—although the ILet potentially will allow the pump to learn how. Every system requires you to change out infusion sets that can kink or come out of the body.  All of these systems require learning on the part of the user and the machine. 

Perhaps in another 20 years, we will see a true artificial pancreas.  Maybe in another 30 years, it will be available to everyone who needs one.  In the meantime, people with diabetes must continue to educate themselves on the various features of insulin pumps and choose the pump that best fits their lifestyle.

Download our ebook to help you find the right insulin pump for you.

Back Away from the Pump. It is NOT Your Toy.

At the end of August, my son got a new pump. We had been lovers of the Cozmo pump for over 10 years.  It physically hurt to have to put it away but with no warranty and a child living hundreds of miles away, it seemed best to make sure that he had a pump with a company still behind it if he had any issues.

We both shed a few tears as we put his beloved “Lean Green Pumping Machine” in a box and brought out his new pump.  When we sat down with his pump trainer, the trainer dealt with my son. Mom stayed in the background.  The trainer talked to him when going through how it worked. My son is too big for me to hover over his shoulder so again, I just sat back and let him learn. It felt a little strange.

After she left, he let me touch the remote bolus and test drive it a bit.  Soon though, it was hands off. I could touch it at night if he was out of range but that was it. I had not other reason to use it. If there was a change to be made, he did it. If there was a site change to be done, he did it.

As time went on, I used the pump less and less and I began to put it out of my mind. This was not my new toy to check out. It was his.  When we had a problem, I grabbed the manual to help him figure out where to go but again, I checked a book while he was six steps ahead of me navigating through the pump screen itself.

It has been five and a half months since my son started on his new pump and now I can barely figure out how to bolus him with it. On the other hand, he has no problem making corrections, adjustments or anything else required.

A few weeks ago, a friend and I were talking about new pumps for our kids. Her child is also holding strong to her Cozmo but they know that a new pump needs to happen sooner rather than later. I casually told the mother not to be concerned about the pump that her child goes on next because she won’t be playing with it. It will be her child’s pump and Mom doesn’t need to know how to operate it.

She thanked me.  We have been so used to handling everything, checking out each device, and learning on an ongoing basis that as parents, we can forget that this isn’t our disease. When our children were 2, 3 or 5, this was our disease no matter what anyone else said. Now that our children are 16, 17 or 20 we have very little input.  We have been relegated to the sidelines whether we wanted to be or not.  We can make suggestions. We can nag a little but our children are now young adults who will do what they feel is best. The only thing we can now hope for is that some of what we have taught them along the way has found a home in their own thought processes. It’s a huge step but we can all do this with one foot in front of the other…and back away from the pump. animas-vibe

Go Ahead and Complain

The other week I noticed nothing but customer service complaints filling my Facebook news feed. I was shocked and wondered if there was something in the wind.  It didn’t matter if someone was in a restaurant or dealing with their cell phone, they were having issues with horrific customer service. Sadly, this made me feel better when I began to have my own issues.

My son’s glucometer was having issues. It was eating batteries with astonishing speed. It had reached a point where he was no longer using it much to my dismay.  This is the meter that “talks” to his pump and gives me a true idea of his bg levels each week when we review things.

I called the customer support number and so began my run around. It appears, in a review of my situation later, that every crack that I could fall through I did! It was terribly frustrating but it also reminded me of a few things.

First is how important our pharmaceutical reps can be when we have problems.  After asking around and finding out that the service I was receiving was extremely unusual, I contacted my rep to see if she could be of any assistance.  She was horrified!  She apologized and was instantly looking for any and all help that she could get for me.  She did not stop until things were resolved.  I loved this lady before she became my son’s pump rep and now I truly love how she goes above and beyond for her customers.

Secondly was how those annoying spiels about how they are recording your conversations actually have a benefit to the customer. If you know exactly when you called and you feel that you were not treated properly, management can pull up the call and see what has happened.  In my case, I was treated fine, my issue just got lost in many transitions.  I have however received horrible service from a person on the phone with a different glucometer years ago.  The woman told me that the problem with my meter’s accuracy was related to me having dirty towels that my son was drying his hands on.  To say I was insulted was an understatement.  Later follow-up resolved that issue and the woman was re-educated.

Customer service is huge for those of us who’s lives, or children’s lives, depend on medical equipment.  Personally, I have met many people in the industry from all over North America.  They all genuinely want to help.  “Stuff” does happen.  Mistakes can be made but I have also learned that these same companies want to learn from their mistakes.  Let your reps know if you have issues.  They want to fix things for you. They want you to be healthy and satisfied with their products. That’s good for everyone.

complaints

Changing of the Pump

We finally did it…and it hurt. After 10 years of using a Cozmo insulin pump, and almost a year of no warranty, my son got a new insulin pump.

I was warned years ago that when we changed from Cozmo, we were best to simply forget that we ever owned a Cozmo. I was told to go forward as if this new pump was the very first one you had ever used. That was the only way to avoid the grief and pain that came with change. Boy were they right!

The change itself was beyond painless. I knew the pump that my son was okay with (if he had to retire his Cozmo).  The only issue was the color.  I contacted my Animas rep and in literally a matter of days, she had the pump ordered and was in our kitchen to do all of the training. Karyn is beyond amazing!

As we went through the features of his Ping versus the features we had on our Cozmo, Karyn was just as sad as we were to be switching pumps. She told us that she wanted some of those features on her pump! Kindly, another Animas employee asked that I send her a list of some of the features we were missing in hopes of one day being able to secure them for use in an Animas pump.  Did I mention that this company really has great people working for them?

The Ping doesn’t automatically switch basals from weekday to weekend. It doesn’t remind my son when to change his sites. It also doesn’t allow you to preset personalized temporary basal rates or do all of your pump changes on your computer and beam it back to your pump. It does have a remote that speaks to the pump.  Granted we had a Cozmonitor that did that too but we haven’t used it in years and it was attached to the back of the pump.  The Ping remote is a handheld devise that allows me to test my son at night, and do a correction without searching under the covers for his pump.

The Ping also allows him to upload his pump to a website and then Mom can “see” all of his bg tests as well as pump issues and basal rates.  This was a great comfort for reasons I will discuss in another post.

We are now about three weeks into pumping with the Ping.  There have been real glitches. We have both accidentally stopped boluses.  He has somehow suspended a basal rate.  He has failed to put a cartridge in properly and had issues but we will get there. This is still a good pump. It has a warranty if we have problems. We have great support and did I mention that its now under warranty?ping