Choosing an insulin pump is personal

chosing an insulin pump

Choosing an insulin pump is a very personal experience. Anyone who tells you otherwise is basically lying to you. To pump or not to pump, to go with tubing or no tubing, it is all a matter of personal preference.

When we first began looking for an insulin pump for my son it was 2002 and he was 4 years old. The only requirement he had was that it could NOT be the blue pump. Everyone he saw seemed to have a blue insulin pump and he wanted to be different. As a parent, I knew that there were other things to consider. At first, however, I wasn’t quite sure what they were.

I read books like Pumping Insulin. I reached out to the parent email list on the Children with Diabetes website. Finally, I consulted with friends and began to compile my own list of features that our insulin pump had to have.

Get our insulin pump shopping list ebook.

It was important for this to be the most up-to-date insulin pump. I was paying for this pump out of my own pocket and would have it for the next four years. I wanted the best technology for my money.

My son was only four so it had to be able to deliver very small amounts of insulin. Because we were new to pumping, certain alerts were also going to make our journey a little easier.

I didn’t order the blue pump. I didn’t order from the rep who became a lifelong friend. The other rep whom I met for coffee and answered every question I had, also did not get our business. I felt horrible not purchasing from either of these amazing people but pumping is personal. I had to go with the pump that fit us. They understood.

wearing an insulin pump

I chose a brand new insulin pump. It had everything that we wanted in a pump. It had features that he would need in the coming four years and features that were perfect for our life at that time. This was an insulin pump that was ideal for our family.

Let me repeat that…it was ideal for our family. It was not ideal for everyone’s family. This was a pump that was not ideal for every person with diabetes. That is the thing with insulin pumps and with diabetes in general…everyone is different. Everyone’s needs, wants, and budgets are different. The technology has to fit the person.

If you are looking at an insulin pump for the very first time, here are five things to consider…

insulin pumps

1. Do you want tubing or not?

For some people, being attached to something 24/7 can be overwhelming. This might mean that an insulin pump is not for them. It may also mean that they might be better suited to a pump that has no tubing like the Omnipod. Other people find that having a pump at the end of their tubing allows them to know where their “pancreas” is at all times and gives them peace of mind.

2. Is a Continuous Glucose Monitor important to you?

Do you need a continuous glucose monitor with your insulin pump? Are you already using one? Do you want a pump that “talks” to your CGM? Do you prefer the Flash Meter system?

There are some insulin pumps with CGMs built into them. This can be a pro or a con depending on how you look at it. It is great to not have to be concerned about carrying or dealing with another device but technology is changing so rapidly that it can be nice to have a stand-alone device that is more updated than the one integrated into your pump.

3. Does it update itself?

As I said, for me it was vital to have to most uptodate technology. My thinking was that if I was spending that kind of money, why did I want a Kia when I could get a Cadillac for the same price?

Insulin pumps are constantly changing. New models are being brought to the FDA and Health Canada on a regular basis for approval. Some people, like me, want the most advanced technology for their money. Other people are okay with any insulin pump as long as it delivers insulin. Again, an insulin pump is a personal choice.

Currently, in the Canadian and US markets, there is only one insulin pump company that offers upgrades without having to purchase a new insulin pump. A Tandem insulin pump has the capability to remotely update its software without the need to purchase an entirely new device.

4. How much insulin do you need?

The reservoir or insulin cartridge is what will hold the insulin in your pump. Depending on your age and needs, size can make a huge difference.

Teens for example, tend to go through a lot of insulin. An insulin pump with a 2mL(200 unit) cartridge will not last them nearly as long as a 3mL (300 unit) cartridge. Changing the reservoir takes time out of your day and that can be annoying to some. If you hate changing out your insulin reservoir, this might be something that you have to think about.

Also, depending on your age and lifestyle, basal rates and bolus amounts are important. The basal rate is the amount of background insulin that your pump is delivering to you every hour. Each pump delivers that background insulin differently and has different maximum and minimum amounts.

To get a rough idea of how much background insulin you might need, look at the amount of long-acting insulin you are currently using and divide it by 24. This is a very rough guess and will change with an insulin pump but it will tell you if you need smaller or larger basal rates.

Bolus amounts are the amount of insulin that you will inject (or bolus) to cover your meals. If you are a big eater or you have a high carbohydrate to insulin ratio, you are going to want a pump that can handle that. If you are someone who is very sensitive to insulin, then small, precise bolus amounts will be very important to you.

5. What sort of alerts will you need?

Will you remember when to do an infusion set change? Do you need a reminder to let you know if you forgot to take insulin to cover a meal? Is it important to you to have an alert that lets you know if you are dropping low or spiking during the day?

These are just some of the alerts that are found on some of the insulin pumps currently on the North American market. When searching for an insulin pump, take a look at the alerts and see which ones you will use and which ones you can do without.

Choosing an insulin pump can be overwhelming. Make a list of what you require in an insulin pump. Think about the five key things I mentioned above. Add your own features that you feel are important like screen size and temporary basal patterns.

Once you have your list (we have a great checklist of features here), contact your local insulin pump reps. Contact all of them, not just the one from the pump company that you know the most about or the one that you are leaning towards. Get to know them. Get a feel for how they treat you. Learn about their payment plans and customer service. Will they let you try out the pump?

Make sure that you choose the pump that is the right fit for you. You are the one who will have to deal with it 24/7 for the next 4-5 years, no one else.

Get our questions to ask your pump rep.

An Overview of BC’s New Insulin Pump Program

BC insulin pump program expands

The internet has been abuzz. The provincial government of BC lived up to an election promise by removing the cap on its insulin pump program. There was celebrating in the streets…until the fine print of the new program was read.

You see, this program will be unlike any other program in the country.  It will be a two-tiered program that seems to favour one insulin pump company over the others.

The issue is complex and very emotionally charged. Let’s take a closer look and you can decide for yourself if this is a step in the right direction or a step on a new and slippery path.

No more age cap

This is big news.  Adults no longer have to pay for their insulin pump out of pocket if they don’t have private insurance.  One pumper I spoke with as spent almost $20,000 to purchase insulin pumps over the past 15 years.  That is a lot for an individual to come up with every 5 years.  It is not surprising that she sees this as a welcome relief!

A two-tiered program

This is the news that has some people scratching their heads and wondering if this is such a good program after all.

All residents with diabetes will be eligible for an Omnipod insulin pump and supplies under tier one.  There will be no deductible for this system.

If you do not want this insulin pump system and feel that a Medtronic insulin pump would be better suited for your needs, you will have to convince your doctor of this as well.  Under tier two, a portion of your insulin pump and supplies will be covered if your physician prescribes a tubed (Medtronic) insulin pump.  If you simply want to own a tubed pump but your doctor does not deem it medically necessary, you will have to pay all costs out of pocket.

You can read all of the details on the BC government website here.

A pump is better than no pump

There is a school of thought that any pump is better than no pump and I agree with that.  If you want to use an insulin pump, then this is a fabulous option if you have no coverage. You can also work with your doctor to attempt to get some relief on a tubed insulin pump if that is your preference.

It’s a win for the little guy

Some people are claiming that this is a huge coup for the little guy.  The small insulin pump company Insulet is the preferred insulin pump for the province of BC.  That is rather significant I will agree.

It’s a start

One thing that I always tell people who ask me for tips on advocacy is to think of their “ask” as a cookie.  Every piece of the cookie that you get is a step forward.  Often you don’t get the entire “ask” (cookie) at one go so you keep asking.  You keep enjoying each bite, knowing that you are working towards having that entire cookie.

Conclusion

For residents of BC, this is another step towards the ultimate cookie. There were pumps for kids. There were pumps for adults up to age 25 and now there are Omnipods for anyone who wants them and assistance on tier two, tubed pumps.  It another step towards the goal of coverage for everyone regardless of age who wishes to use a sensor-augmented insulin pump.

Congratulations BC residents on your new insulin pump program!

If you are considering an insulin pump, check out our eBooklet to ensure that you get the right pump for your personal needs.

Hot Tips for Managing Diabetes in the Deep Winter Cold

winter tips with diabetes

The weather outside is frightful! The temperatures are dropping and we are in the midst of deep winter cold.  Managing to stay warm can be a challenge on days like these, so how do you manage your diabetes in the winter? Here are a few things to remember…

Insulin freezes.

Insulin is liquid. It can freeze. Make sure not to leave insulin in your car.  When you are outside, keep it close to your body. This also means that if you are using an insulin pump, make sure to tuck your pump close to your body to keep things running properly.

If you think your insulin has been frozen, throw it out! Don’t take any chances.  It will not work as efficiently once the proteins have been frozen.

Keep warm!

That means keeping your diabetes devices warm as well! I just told you to keep the insulin in your pump warm, but did you also know that your pump (like your phone) also needs to stay warm? Keep your pump and CGM under your winter clothing and as close to your body as you can.

If you are using a tSlim pump, watch for the low-temperature warning on the pump.  This will tell you that your pump is not functioning as it should because of the cold.

Check your blood glucose level.

I know, you normally check but when it is cold out make sure that you still check…a lot.  Some people see their bg levels rise in the cold weather while others see it go up.  Don’t guess or go by how you feel–check then adjust with food or insulin.

Before you check, make sure that your meter is warm as well.  Glucometers function poorly below 40F (4C).  If you feel that your glucometer could be too cold, warm it in your armpit for a few minutes. It will quickly return to a functioning state.

Keep your hands warm.

It can be hard to check your blood glucose levels when fingers are cold and blood isn’t circulating properly.  Keep your hands warm and toasty to help make finger sticks a bit easier.  Wear warm gloves. You may want to consider using mitts that have removable fingers to make it easier to check.

Carry glucose that won’t freeze.

Juice packs are a handy way to treat lows but when you are playing in the snow, glucose tablets and granola bars are probably a better choice.  Also make sure to keep your glucagon warm and safe.  Frozen glucagon will be as useful as frozen insulin.

Winter activities can be fun but make sure you are prepared.  Follow some of these few hot tips to manage diabetes in the winter and enjoy your time in Mother Nature’s deep freeze!

Animas, We are Heartbroken

Animas is closing

Johnson and Johnson announced on September 5th of 2017  that they were closing the doors on their insulin pump division in Canada and the US.  Animas Insulin Pumps would be no more. Animas insulin pumpers in North America were heartbroken.

While some saw it coming in the corporate rumour mill, others were blindsided.

Animas had done something that many companies in many industries are striving to do…they had  created a feeling that you were family.  Whether you were an Animas insulin pumper or you used another brand, you had probably attended an Animas event and were treated royally.

The employees with Animas all seemed to genuinely care about you.  They checked in on you and took the time to know your family.  I had the pleasure to work closely with many members of the Animas family over the years.  They will be huge assets for the next company that employs them. I am sure that many of them are just as saddened as we are.

This is not the first time that an insulin pump company has closed its doors.  We have been here before…twice.

Cozmo (personally a pump like no other) closed its doors in 2009.  We still have two in my son’s closet.  I have friends who still wear this as their pump of choice.  It is doable even 8 years later.

Most recently, Asante, a pump revered by many who tried it,  was also forced to step away from the insulin pump market.  Their users were devastated.  They were heartbroken and felt lost–just like Animas insulin pumpers are feeling today.

What do I do next?

Take things one step at a time.  The great thing about insulin pumps is that, while some have quirks, many are pretty sturdy and last.  If you have more than one pump in your house–usually because one was out of warranty and you purchased a new one right away “just in case”, relax.  If for some reason, your current pump stops functioning, go back on your old one while you decide which pump to try next! Just make sure to write down those settings and keep them in a safe place.

How long do I have before I can’t get supplies?

You don’t have  to stockpile supplies   You don’t have to run out and buy a new insulin pump tomorrow.  The Animas press release stated that warranties will continue to be honoured until September 2019. Cartridges will be be available until that date as well.

Statements from both Animas and Medtronic note that supplies will still be able to be ordered in the same way as before. Nothing changes, except when your Animas pump stops working, you will not be able to purchase a new one.

Thank you…

So while we take a breath and rethink our next steps…our next pump…our next option, I want to take a moment and say thank you.  Thank you to the men and women who worked so hard to make Animas a different company.  I truly appreciated getting to know so many of you.  You brought us a new experience in caring.  I hope that we meet again soon, with a new company perhaps bringing new options in diabetes care.

Options are the most important thing.  Make sure to always know your options and always choose the option that works best for you and your lifestyle.

Preparing for Disasters with Type 1 Diabetes

This year we have seen many mandatory evacuations because of both hurricanes and fires.  When you live with diabetes in your home, how do you prepare for disasters? Do you have a list of evacuation supplies checked off and ready to go?

People in the hurricane states, often have an emergency tote or bag that they can grab on the way out of the door but remembering everything that you could need can be a challenge.  Over the years, we have come up with a detailed list of evacuation supplies for people with diabetes.  In lieu of recent events, I thought that it might be a good time to go over some of the items we think you need when preparing for disasters with type 1 diabetes.

Download your free emergency evacuation supplies checklist here.

Keep a diabetes bag near the door

diabetes supplies bag

As I mentioned, it is important to have all of your supplies in a quick, easy-to-grab container. Evacuations can be planned, but sometimes you are only given minutes to have all of your valuables ready to leave.  Make sure your diabetes bag is always in the same place so that you won’t waste valuable time trying to find it.

Packing Basics

Make sure that you have some of the basics like a Frio pack if you live in a warm climate.  You will also want a flashlight and spare batteries in case your area loses power.  Candles and wooden matches can also provide light and heat if need be.

A first aid kit should also be in your emergency container. While you may have a lot of diabetes supplies, other medical emergencies can happen and basic first aid is a must.  Don’t forget to add anti-diarrhea and anti-nausea medication to your kit.  You should also have copies of all prescriptions in case you are away from your home pharmacy and need to access your medication refills.

Food and drink

We have all seen the images of people stocking up on cases of water and in an emergency it is vital.  If you have drinkable tap water, fill up milk jugs, juice jugs, and other items with water to take with you.  Also pack juice packs, tinned food as well as cheese and cracker snacks. If you pack tinned items, don’t forget a hand can-opener as well.

Diabetes Supplies

tote for diabetes supplies

It is recommended that you pack two weeks worth of diabetes supplies with you during an evacuation.  Consider bringing a spare meter, spare batteries, alcohol wipes, pump supplies, insulin, syringes, ketone strips, and medical tape.

Other items to remember

Don’t forget to bring spare blankets, cash in case bank machines are down, and pet food for your furry family members.

I am sure that I have forgotten a few things but I would suggest that you view the Diabetes Advocacy Emergency page or download the evacuation checklist.  This will help you feel a bit more prepared should a disaster hit your community.

Get your free evacuation supplies checklist here. 

Diabetes is harder some days than others

This post was originally written in 2009.  My son now manages his own diabetes care.  He wakes for his lows.  He treats his highs but one thing remains the same–diabetes is hard no matter who is responsible for care for the daily tasks. 

bug on windshield from Diabetes Advocacy

“Some days you’re the windshield, some days you’re the bug.” Today I am definitely feeling like the bug!

It was after midnight and of course I was dying to get to sleep. I had set my alarm for early the next morning.  It would be my son’s last day of school.

I found a meter and a strip. I grabbed a lancet, waded through all of the junk that the boys had left on the stairs rather than putting away. Off I headed to test my son’s blood sugar level. I hope it would be the last check for a few hours. One check and I could sleep!

We had been out for pizza earlier that day to celebrate good grades so I was certain that my youngest son would still be high. He had been  16 mmol (288mg/dl) earlier in the evening, so you know I was certain that I was going to be able to rest.

Wrong! Diabetes doesn’t work that way.

I took the meter. I lanced his finger. A pool of blood was created. The strip refused to suck.

What the???? Okay, I cleaned the finger. I got more blood. I tried again. The glucometer just barely accepted the blood. I waited for the reading…E5. It was an error reading!!

There hadn’t been enough blood to get a blood sugar reading. Oh the lovely four letter words that were on the tip of my tongue as I headed back downstairs to get more test strips and another glucometer.

I found a new meter. I was certain that this one had to be better than the last. A new test strip was in my hand. The same lancing device was being used. Back up the stairs I went.  This time I grumbled and picked up items as I went by.

Once again, I lanced my son’s finger. Again, I got a large amount of blood. The strip sucked the blood this time! I walked towards the stairs not even considering having to correct a high blood glucose reading. That was a good thing because he didn’t need insulin.  He was 3.2 (57).

He was low!

I uttered a few more choice words as I shuffled off to get some juice. I filled a glass, found a straw and trudged up the stairs for a third time in less than five minutes.

My son wasn’t keen on drinking. I continued to cajole him until he finally began to sip. Thankfully he drank it all except the last few drops. Those were sucked up into the straw and somehow flew all over his pillow.  I was not happy.  There was now strawberry juice all over a cream pillowcase.  I cleaned it off as best as I could.

I waited.

Fifteen minutes can become a lifetime when you are dying for sleep. These are the moments when you just think to yourself…diabetes is hard.  Why us?

Eventually, it was time to recheck.  He was  5.5 (99) and I was finally off to bed for two hours before it would be time to check his blood sugar again.

Diabetes is hard.  Diabetes care is a challenge.  Some days things seem okay…and other days you feel like you are a bug squished against a windshield.

If you are feeling overwhelmed by diabetes, join our online group and share your feelings with others who live with diabetes too.

Tips for Managing Diabetes in the Summer

managing diabetes in the summer

It’s summer!! I mean it really is finally summer! Some areas have been enjoying great weather for a bit but where I live–well, I kind of wondered if summer was ever going to show up.   Now that it is really here, let’s talk about a few tips for managing diabetes in the summer months.

Keep your insulin and test strips cool.

Summer heat can literally ruin blood glucose test strips and insulin.  If you are on injections, make sure to keep your insulin stored in a cool place. If you are pumping, again, make sure that your pump doesn’t get overheated.  You may even want to consider changing out your cartridges more often to ensure that your insulin is fresh and hasn’t been compromised by the heat.

Frio Pack  for managing diabetes in the summer diabetes advocacy

Test strips also react to extreme temperatures.  Again, make sure that they are stored in a cool place.  If you are traveling to the beach or theme parks, you may want to invest in a FRIO Insulin Cooling Pump Wallet.  They are convenient little cooling packs that will help to keep things chilled.

If you don’t have access to Frio packs, another great suggestion is to use frozen juice packs.  You can keep your supplies cool and are prepared for lows!

Mastistol and Antiperspirant are pumpers’ new best friends.

mastisol to stick infusion sets in the summer diabetes advocacy

Summer often means swimming and swimming can mean chlorine. Chlorine can bring extra headaches for people with diabetes using an insulin pump in the summer. Personally,  the only way for us  to keep sites on in chlorine was by making sure that a product like Mastisol Liquid Adhesive was used on the skin prior to set insertion.

For people using an insulin pump and/or a CGM, you may also want to look at using an antiperspirant on the site.  Apply a light coat of antiperspirant (not deodorant) to the insertion site area.  This will help to keep sites in place when your body begins to sweat!

Have snacks everywhere.

jelly beans to treat summer lows diabetes advocacy

Summer heat can bring its own challenges for managing diabetes. It tends to mean more exertion and rapidly dropping blood glucose levels.  Make sure to carry extra snack foods with you wherever you go.  One parent suggests that you stock up on Freezies.  They are perfect treats for lows and also help ward off dehydration.  Other families have suggested fruit and frozen grapes as must have snacks for on the go.

Drink lots of water.

water diabetes advocacy

Dehydration is a real problem in the heat.  It is especially important for people living with diabetes to stay hydrated because dehydration will cause blood glucose levels to spike.

Check BG levels often.

Blood Ketone meter diabetes advocacy

Heat, exhaustion and the fun of the sun can really mess with blood glucose levels so make sure that you check blood glucose levels often to avoid any serious diabetes-related emergencies.

Bring extras!

infusion sets diabetes advocacy

As I have said, infusion sets can fall out.  Blood sugar levels can go crazy.  It is vital that you carry extras of everything–extra snacks, extra water, extra test strips, extra insulin and extra infusion sets just in case.

Wear sunscreen.

sunscreen diabetes advocacy

I know, everyone is supposed to wear sunscreen so really is this a diabetes issue? Well no…and yes! It turns out that sunburns have been known to really mess with blood glucose levels.  The moral of the story? Stay hydrated and wear sunscreen to help keep blood glucose levels in check.

Have fun!

toddler from Diabetes Advocacy

Finally, in Canada especially, we just don’t seem to see summer for long enough so plan ahead and enjoy all that this summer has to offer you and your family!

If you are planning on traveling to find the sun this year, don’t forget to check out our complete travel checklist so that you don’t forget anything before you go!

I don’t have diabetes but diabetes can still bring me down.

tired thanks to diabetes Diabetes Advocacy

Diabetes is exhausting.  The emotional toll of check, calculate, bolus and more is incredible.

I am lucky.  I don’t have diabetes, but diabetes can still bring me down.  Because I don’t have diabetes, when it does tend to be too much I can step away. I can put it on the back burner and regroup before I dive in again. I wish everyone with diabetes had it that easy.

For years I was my son’s external pancreas.  It was exhausting.  I never slept more than four hours at a time.  If I woke up during the night, I checked his blood glucose levels.  We had no Continuous Glucose Monitor.  We just had me. It was my job to make sure that he was in range.  I was the one to calculate carbs, adjust insulin ratios and log blood glucose readings.

My son tested and learned alongside of me but I carried the bulk of the burden…until he turned 16.  At 16, he decided that he could handle it all.  He carried the entire burden for the next three years unless he was visiting me.  When he was with me, I took over as much as he wanted.

Taking over wasn’t the same as doing it 24/7.  That being said, being an external pancreas also wasn’t the same as being the one to experience the highs, lows and pokes with needles multiple times per day.  Not being able to “fix it” or take it away could (can) bring me down as much as the pressure of daily diabetes care.

I  still wish that I could take the pain away. I wish that my son would know a different life.  There isn’t a day that I don’t ache for the families and other people living with diabetes knowing that they can never stop testing or injecting.  Their very lives depended on it.

Knowing that fact can also cause sadness. I ache for families that struggle to keep their children safe in school. I get frustrated for those individuals who are fighting to receive insulin at a fair and decent price. My heart breaks for those who are having a hard time paying for their supplies and who can’t afford the best in diabetes care.

I don’t have diabetes.  Diabetes can bring me down but I won’t let it keep me down.  Each day I wake ready to work a little harder.  Each day I will share what has worked for us and hope to inspire and assist others living with diabetes.  I will continue to work with individuals and groups to create better care for people with diabetes regardless of education or income level.  Diabetes can bring me down but it will not win. My battle won’t end until a cure is found. Don’t give up either. We are here for you!

Talk to more people living with diabetes and advocating for a better life in our online Facebook community.

Which Liberal Government?

which liberal government...Diabetes Advocacy

This summer I saw a number of variations of this status posted all over Facebook… “I would like to highlight the Liberal government removing the subsidy for blood test strips. Diabetics need very frequent blood testing, up to 5+ times a day. The cost of strips is $70.00 – outcome – reduced blood glucose testing and more hospital admissions from hyper or hypoglycemic episodes. Diabetes . . . I am asking if everyone could put this as their status for 1 hour. I’m pretty sure I know the ones that will. Think of someone you know or love who has or has had diabetes. My hope is that in 2016 a cure will be found. Will you post it for 1 hour? To honor those who have fought or are fighting diabetes.? “

Many people were sharing this status.  Many more were asking…where is this from? Whose government is doing this? The answers were surprising.

How many Liberal Governments were cutting funding?

I was certain that it was Newfoundland.  In the spring the new Liberal government had announced changes to the provincial prescription drug plan.  They were limiting the number of test strips to 2500 annually for those using MDI, 700 for those using just a long-acting insulin, 100 for those not using insulin and 50 for those who have only recently been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.*

As this post continued to make its rounds, however, I was shocked to see that a number of other locations were also claiming that this was a reality in their home area. People from as far away as Australia were saying that this had happened to them.  They said it was their government that the post was directed at.  All I could think was, “this is crazy!”

The high cost of tight control

For years, study after study has shown how important tight control and home blood glucose monitoring is.  They have shown that good control equates to improved health outcomes AND immediate financial benefit in terms of reduced loss of work. Why would governments think that they were saving money by cutting access to blood glucose testing strips?

This entire scenario hits too close to home as my son turns 19. He will soon be in a position of losing his health care coverage.  His days of being covered by his father’s private health care plan are numbered. 

My stomach aches each time I think of this safety net being taken away. He does have some coverage from the province.  We will find a way but what about other children?

I don’t mean small children, I mean adults who are struggling to find their way.  What about them? What about their families? How do they cope? How do you work a minimum wage job, pay your rent, buy your groceries AND cover your diabetes care costs?

Again, we know how important blood glucose checking is. As parents, we have spent years asking our children “Did you check your blood?” and “What was your blood glucose reading?”  How do they answer those questions when they can’t afford the test strips? How accurate will their guess have to be?

Why blood glucose testing is important

Without proper blood glucose checking, they cannot accurately dose their insulin. They cannot make exact judgment calls on corrections.  They will run a high risk of complications.  They most likely will have more sick days.  This will cost governments more money in lost tax revenue and create an increased drain on hospital services.

If a person with diabetes is unable to check their blood and stop potentially dangerous high blood glucose levels on their own, they will be forced to seek hospital treatments.  A 2008 report in the Toronto Star suggests that one typical hospital stay then cost approximately $7000**.

$7000…you can get 100 strips for $80-$100.  If you test 8-10 times per day that one hospital stay would still cost more than 2 years worth of test strips. Two years. 

It would appear that the people in charge of making these policy changes need to better understand what they have done.  Basic math shows the folly in such policies. We can only hope that public pressure and common sense will ultimately prevail.  Our loved ones with diabetes need access to the proper medical supplies to ensure that they can continue to be healthy, productive members of our societies.

*http://www.thetelegram.com/News/Local/2016-04-17/article-4500650/Changes-coming-to-provincial-drug-program/1

**https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2008/03/18/average_hospital_stay_costs_nearly_7000_study.html

He’s Got This

Over Easter, my youngest son came to visit.  Each time he visits me I am shocked by how much he has grown. My little boy is long gone and a young man is emerging. A child with diabetes is being replaced by a young person with diabetes and I stand in awe.

This time I stood back a bit more. I tried not to fall into old habits of taking over care or nagging about testing. I gently reminded. I compared carb counts now and again when asked.  I tested him at night at his request but mostly I sat and watched.

I wondered how his care was going. He hasn’t told me an A1c in years. I worried about his rates. I worried about his health.  The more I tested, the more I watched, the more my pride grew.

He wasn’t perfect.  He still doesn’t test as much as I would like but when he did test, his results were awesome. When he ate junk, which he doesn’t do as much any more, he nailed the bolus.  When he spiked because of a low cartridge and air being delivered instead of insulin, the spike was no longer in the 20s (360+) it hovered in the low teens.

I sat back and realized that he’s got this.  All of those years of preaching, teaching and sharing have paid off.  He is taking care of himself.  He is trying to protect his body from itself and doing a good job.

In a recent conversation I reminded him that he is the expert in his care.  It is his job to ensure that he is able to demonstrate that to medical professionals that he sees.  He should listen to them and be willing to accept their help but he may also have to remind them that he has been doing this all of his life.  He has been privileged to be trained by some of the very best people in diabetes care in the world.  He has a very good handle on things and a huge support network to reach out to when he is in doubt.

He explained that he finds that very frustrating.  He doesn’t want to get into a contest of who knows more when he sees someone but he feels that after all of these years he does know his body.  He is very healthy.  He has got this…and he has!

hes-got-this-poster2