Sad to see Dex Leave

Ready to use DexoCom!
Ready to use DexoCom!

As I mentioned, we were privileged to be able to try using a DexCom for seven days over the Christmas holidays. I was super excited. My son however was not exactly thrilled but willing to see what all of the fuss was about.

I am pretty sure I allowed him to put down his suitcase and open his Christmas gifts, but I don’t believe I gave him time for much else before we learned how to start the DexCom process.  I had been encouraged to watch the video a few times before actually inserting the device, so I had my son sit with me as we began.  The video paused and allowed you to do a step before continuing.  This was very user-friendly.

As we reached the insertion stage, my son suggested that we stop a bit and replay multiple times before injecting him with anything!  I agreed.  I was terrified that I would mess up.  Not only are these sites expensive, but we only had one to try and our rep was away enjoying the holidays.  I had to be perfect!

I was finally confident that I should be able to do this. My son was not exactly feeling the same level of confidence but eventually relented and allowed me to jab his body with the large contraption. It was a success! The sensor was in his body and he had not died. I asked him about the level of pain he experienced.  (It didn’t look like a big needle so I never even suggested asking him if he wanted to numb the area–bad mom)  He said it was close to having a site inserted–maybe a little less painful.  I was psyched!

Next came putting on the transmitter.  That was a challenge. I understand that it gets easier with time but I will say that figuring out how to get it to attach the first time took us a bit.  Once it was on, it was time to wait our two hours before the first calibration.  I was super excited to see what would happen.  My son was still not as thrilled but glad to no longer have his mother poking at his belly.

Two hours later we did our first calibration and my son resumed his normal activities. One of the first thing he did after putting in the sensor was to enjoy a nice jacuzzi tub.  The sensor is waterproof but I was still having a mild heart attack wondering if it really could take this.  I told my son that all was fine as long as the receiver stayed dry…but I was still nervous.

Would the jacuzzi mess things up? Despite telling him that he didn’t have to test as much with the DexCom, I made him test a few times just to prove to myself that it really was as good as everyone said.  The research didn’t lie.  The end users didn’t lie.  This little machine was awesome!

The accuracy was not perfect the first few days.  I had been told that the DexCom accuracy was not as great on the high-end as it was on the low-end.  We found that to be true.  When it said he was high, he was often higher still. That didn’t bother me though. It showed me a trend. He was high and going higher (we had a bad site).  It really didn’t matter if he was 15 or 25 (270-450). He was high and needed a correction. A finger stick gave us where to correct from but the DexCom told us if we were on the right track.  For me, the combination was amazing!

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Yes! It really did say he was dropping!

During the trial period, we had extreme highs (First lesson–do not calibrate when high. Since the accuracy already isn’t great, your sensor will be off a bit more than when its calibrated at reading closer to in range).  We also had lows.  The first low my son had while wearing the sensor came as we arrived at our cabin. We were unpacking our gear and of course he couldn’t help.  He was low.

“Really? Is it working? Did it tell you that you are low? Can you feel it? Are you actually low?”  My son scarcely avoided an eye-roll and passed me his receiver. It read low! There were downward arrows! He said that yes he felt low and we treated him.  The DexCom then told us that he wasn’t falling any more.  He could help us get the rest of the gear out of the truck and he would be fine! Oh happy days!

Yes, I loved the DexCom.  As we became more familiar with it, the accuracy also improved. I am not sure if  the sensor was working better with his body or if the increased data that it had to work with through a few days of calibration improved the accuracy but it was wonderful!

At night, I would get up and take his receiver into my room so that he could have a break from diabetes care.  It sat on my night side table and instead of getting up and poking him, I could roll over and watch a graph.  A non-D parent will never know how soothing looking at a graph can be but let me tell you, it was AMAZING!image

There were nights that my partner wanted to throw it out the window.  My son was high.  The DexCom told me so.  We corrected. The DexCom said it didn’t work.  We injected.  The DexCom said he was falling.  We wanted that.  The constant dialogue of beeps and vibrations were sending Larry over the edge while giving me peace of mind.

Not all nights were full of alarms.  The DexCom allowed me to also see my son have some of the best readings.  I watched one night in amazement has he maintained a steady 4.9mmol (88mg/dL) for hours.  Such a lovely number would normally have sent me into a night filled with stress. Would he drop? Would he rise? I would be testing a lot wondering or I would be pouring chocolate milk down his throat hoping to slow down a decline in blood glucose levels.  With the DexCom, I was able to simply relax and  watch a perfect night unfold in front of me.

The biggest gift that the DexCom brought me was pride in my son.  When he moved away to live with his father, we said he would share readings with me and we would talk about his care.  Well, reality was very different and with the exception of “yep, all is fine”, I have had no real information on how he was doing.  When he visits with me, there are often problems due to change in activity levels and eating as much of Mom’s food as he possibly can in a short window of time.

He still ate a decent amount.  He also was a little less active that he might have been at his father’s but his readings were generally quite good.  The DexCom showed us a few issues–some of which he knew about but hadn’t dealt with. Together we talked about changes.  He challenged me about some ideas and after a discussion, we made the adjustments that we both felt were required.  I was proud to see that he had listened to what he had been told over all of these years.  He was taking ownership of his disease and doing a good job of it.

I was sad to see day 7 arrive.  It was the end of life with a CGM.  It also meant that my son was heading on a plane back to school and his other home.  The last part was the hardest but it also hurt that he would be leaving without this amazing technology.

I asked him what he had thought about the whole thing.  Once again, he was not impressed with the extra site. I think he quite enjoyed being able to simply look at a graph to know what to do about his readings–he was rising, he was falling, he was nice and steady.  He is not quite ready to carry a second device however nor is he ready for a second site.  I see that changing in time.

Our rep kindly offered to let him use it again in the near future if he wants.  I am sure we will take her up on that offer.  I can see his attitude towards the DexCom changing with both use and the changes in his circumstances–moving from the classroom into the workforce.

I was always a firm believer in the benefits of this technology.  This one week trial just confirmed it.  Anyone living with diabetes should have access to this device.  It will change their lives and improve their diabetes care.  A running live-stream movie of blood glucose readings rather than snap shots throughout the day offers such incredible freedom and peace of mind. It should be a standard of care for everyone who has to live with diabetes.

 

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