35 Candy-free Easter Basket Ideas

Candy free Easter

It is almost that time of year again. Time for Easter treats, Easter hunts, the Easter bunny and memorable time with family.  Our house was never really big on a lot of chocolate at Easter.  There was the occasional trail of jelly beans for them to follow but for the most part, my children loved to search for hidden treats like small cars, new colouring books and a new movie to watch. 

Parents of children with diabetes know that it is possible to cover treats with insulin.  If you are multiple daily injections or an insulin pump, you can simply inject or bolus insulin to cover the treat based on your carb to insulin ratio.  Despite that fact, many parents of children with diabetes or not, don’t want to give their children a lot of sugar and are looking for alternatives. For those who are trying to control the amount of “junk food” that their children eat, it can be a challenge to come up with candy-free alternatives. 

Here is a quick list of 35 items we came up with to fill Easter baskets that don’t include candy.

  • Stickers
  • Finger puppets
  • Lip gloss
  • Magic grow toys
  • Bounce balls
  • Magic grow capsules
  • Glitter glue
  • Hair ties
  • Earrings
  • Wind-up toys
  • Slime
  • Play dough
  • Silly putty
  • Temporary tattoos
  • Toy cars
  • Bubbles
  • Nail polish
  • Colouring books
  • Crayons
  • Toy cars
  • Books
  • Movie passes
  • Lego
  • Sidewalk chalk
  • Bath toys
  • Ear phones
  • Body wash
  • Bath bombs
  • Silly string
  • Sunglasses
  • Gift cards
  • Plush toys
  • Tooth brush
  • Socks
  • Body spray

If you are still struggling to fill your child’s basket? Check out these great ideas…

For One-year-olds

easter for one year olds

Baby O and I has fun suggestions including PlayDough packs and rubber boots! Read all of their suggestions here.

For Toddlers

candy free for toddlers

Mommy Takes 5 shows you everything that you need for a toddlers basket from the basket itself to great things to put in it right here!

For all ages

candy free easter

The Teal Bandit has another 35 ides perfect for kids of all ages here.

Heather, over at Finding Our Green Life shares healthy treats as well as more great basket ideas here!

What is your favourite Easter basket idea? Let us know in the comments!

Back to school with diabetes

Back to school with diabetes

Heading back to school can be stressful.  There are new books to buy.  Every child seems to need classroom shoes, gym shoes, walking to school shoes and then there are the gym clothes, jeans and more!

The list is endless but when you are a parent of a child with diabetes, the list is longer still. Thankfully there are a few basics to remember when sending your child with diabetes back to school.

Meet with staff

meet with staff

No matter where you live, you should always make sure that you have a meeting with school staff before your child heads back to school.  If you live in an area that has 504 plans or any sort of diabetes care plans in place, this meeting can be where details are finalized.  If you don’t have any sort of official plans in your district, a meeting with staff is still important.

You want to meet with staff to discuss what they can expect when they have a child with diabetes in their school.  While your child may not be their first child with diabetes, each child’s care needs are different. It is important that they understand your child’s individual treatment plan.

At this meeting you will work together to establish roles.  Carefully outline what do you expect from the teacher and the support staff. Make sure that they understand what they can expect from you.  Finally,  ensure that everyone knows what tasks your child can do on their own.

You should also discuss things like, how will exams be handled?  It is important that school staff understand that  diabetes can cause cognitive impairment when the child is out of range.

You also want to establish a method of communication. The school  should understand that they can contact you and that you would like to be able to stay in touch with them.  Working together will make the year go smoother for everyone.

Click here for a few more ideas of what to take to this meeting.

Gather diabetes supplies.

diabetes supplies

Depending on the age of the child, the list of supplies that you require can be different.  A small child will require a change of clothes just in case he/she is high and has an accident in school.  An older child may require access to a phone or cell phone to ask you questions about their care.

Here are a few basic items that can be left in a backpack or put in a safe place at school.

  • juice boxes or glucose tablets
  • granola bars or other carb rich  and carb free snacks
  • spare test strips
  • meter batteries
  • pump batteries
  • a spare glucometer
  • extra needles or pen tips
  • spare insulin vial (to be kept in a fridge)
  • ketone meter and strips
  • spare infusion set
  • spare insulin reservoir
  • alcohol swabs
  • hand wash
  • water bottle
  • sharps disposal container

Other things to remember

go on field trips

If your schedule allows, volunteer to be a part of activities at school.  This will give you a chance to get to know school staff and they will learn a bit more about you.  It will also allow you to discreetly keep an eye on your child’s care without them feeling different.

For younger children, check to see if supports or nurses are available through your district.  The school may be entitled to extra funding that would allow them to have one on one care for your child for all or part of the day.

Make the year fun! Your child is a child first.  Plan ahead with staff regarding things like parties, extra curricular activities, outings and exams so that your child gets the most out of their school year.

For a guide to care policies in many Canadian schools please check out this link.

It Will Happen and It Will Be Okay–Transitioning to Adult Diabetes Care

graduation

It will happen and it will be okay. That’s what I would tell myself if I could talk to the diabetes parent that I was 15 years ago.

You see, once upon a time I could tell you what my son’s bg level was at 3am. I could tell you what his reading was before breakfast. I knew if he had run high or low during school. I would be able to give you his pre and post supper glucose readings. I knew it all.

I knew when his last site change was. I knew what his last A1c was. Years ago, I could tell you when his glucagon kit was going to expire and how many carbs he ate with his last meal.

Today, I can tell you that my son does test his bg levels. His last site change was just the other night. I know this because he asked for my help.  I know that he sees his diabetes doctor again in April. I know that he has some insulin in the fridge.

I have no idea what his last A1c was. His current basal rates are a mystery to me. It’s a real challenge for me to use his insulin pump.

Years ago, I would never believe that I wouldn’t know these things. I swore that I would always test my son at night as long as he was in my house. I would be hands on in my son’s diabetes care  forever. I was certain. I was wrong.

If you are like I was, you are having a stroke reading this. You are probably thinking…Not me! I will know everything regarding their diabetes care always! I thought so too.

For the bulk of his childhood,  I knew every carbohydrate that entered my son’s mouth. I wrote down every exercise that he did and how it impacted his readings. I micromanaged my son’s type one diabetes like nobody’s business. His care would take me over 40 hours per week.  It literally was a full-time job. Keeping my son alive and healthy was one of my top priorities.

The health of my children is still very important to me but this strange thing has happened–they have become adults.  As an adult, my son has asked that I don’t test him at night.  Sadly he wakes up a lot during the night now and tests himself.  He doesn’t see the sense in bothering me as well.

Because my son is an adult, he comes and goes when he pleases.  He treats his lows at work. He programs his pump while he is at school.  My son is completely in charge of his diabetes care.

It was terrifying at first I will admit. I had a need to know.  He had just as strong of a need for me not to know. He would be vague with his answers about bg readings if he answered at all.  It didn’t matter if I was mad or upset.  It was his condition to deal with and he would quietly show me that he could handle it….and when he couldn’t he would ask me for help.

As I have watched him handle his diabetes care,  I have been amazed.  We still occasionally share carb count guesses. I will look up the carb counts in certain food for him.  I will suggest a temporary basal when he is working long hours.  He will tell me what he has already done.

My role in diabetes care is now  on the periphery.  It shocks me that I have managed it but I have.  One day you will step aside too.  It will be hard.  How far you step will be between you and your child but eventually you will no longer know how to work their insulin pump either.  One day you won’t know their A1c but they will still call you when the going is rough–for you or for them.  For me, that remains a  huge comfort.

I have gone from the most hands on parent on the planet to an average mom.  Diabetes no longer is in my every thought. I now only think of it every few hours.  The most amazing thing is that I am somewhat okay with it all.  Don’t get me wrong, the control freak lives on and would love to know more but my son is an adult.  As a young adult, he has taken ownership of his diabetes and Mom is only allowed glimpses when he deems it okay.

Going to School with Diabetes Has Changed

Today’s prompt for Diabetes Blog Week asks what changes we have seen since diagnosis.

In the past 15+ years, we have seen a lot of changes.  We have seen 5 second glucometer results instead of 30 torturous seconds. We have seen long acting insulin, smart pumps and now sensor augmented pumps.  We have seen Continuous Glucose Monitors go from blinded instruments that you could only get from the hospital to tools that you can wear every day to watch real time trends!

One of the biggest changes that I have seen since my son was diagnosed with diabetes however is how provinces, school boards, and schools are now dealing with children with diabetes here in Canada.

I first began dealing with this issue when my son was 3.  He still had a year to go before he would enter the school system, but the school knew about my knowledge of diabetes care.  They wanted a heads  up on what to expect when a recently diagnosed student returned to school.  Together we were able to explore the roles and needs of both staff and student.

I spent time looking at what was being done in other provinces and other schools.  The results shocked me.  With the exception of New Brunswick, most areas had little to no policies for children with diabetes in schools.  The only thing that they tended to note was whether or not (and usually it was not), they would administer insulin in school and where the insulin was to be kept.

At first I was shocked. Diabetes was not a new disease.  How could it not be dealt with in the school system? Easily…in previous years multiple daily injections, home blood glucose monitoring and insulin pumps were not the norm in diabetes care.  Times were changing and school policies needed to change as well…and they have.

In 2015 provinces such as Newfoundland and Quebec now also have provincial policies in place.  Provinces such as British Columbia are working with their nursing staff to see better protection in place.  In other provinces, people are still working to find something that works for all parties.

The big difference is that today, provinces and parents are talking. Today, school boards are contacting myself, the Canadian Diabetes Association, and parents of children with diabetes to ask what our children’s needs are. There is a willingness to learn and a willingness to create change.

This does not mean that the problem of care for children with diabetes in Canada is solved. It does not mean that parents have no concerns when they send their children with diabetes to schools.  It means that in more places, there are less concerns. It means that in more schools there is already education and policy in place. That is a wonderful thing.  It shows that over time things can change for the better. I am positive that the next 15 years will see many more leaps and bounds for our children with diabetes as they return to school.

diabetes in school
Heading to school with diabetes can be stressful

Luck of the Irish

I am not Irish.  I have never really thought much about St. Patrick’s Day.  As a grade school child, it was a day to make shamrocks and wear green to school.  Over the course of the years, it was just another day.  That was until the year 2000.

That was the year that we all spent wondering if the banks would shut down.  Would the Y2K issue crash everything that we had come to rely on? How would our lives change? Well, Y2K never really seemed to impact much but the year 2000 did forever change my life. It was the year that my two year old son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes and was given just 24 hours to live.

For 15 years, March 17 has been a day of sadness and celebration. I grieve for the life my son never got to have–a life without carb counting, injections or blood glucose tests.  Its been a day when I relive every minute of naivety, fear, panic, and gratitude.

Fifteen years later, I live in a city that celebrates St. Patrick’s day with a holiday.  I have had the opportunity to go to Ireland and fall in love with the country’s rich history.  I enjoy listening to many lively Irish tunes.  Its listening to those songs and thinking of this day that led my mind ot wonder if perhaps it was that Irish luck that protected us all of those years ago.

Perhaps it was the whisper of a leprechaun that put my son to the front of the cue in the doctor’s office on that St. Paddy’s day so many years ago.

The doctor who would go on to look after my son from ICU to an independent teen could have been an oversized leprechaun…with a different color beard of course.  He was definitely a stroke of luck.  He was one of the few doctors in that area who were forward thinking with their prescription of insulin regiments. He also believed in allowing us to learn and grow with my son’s diabetes care.

It was definitely the luck of the Irish that led me to make one of my first ever online searches for “parents of children with diabetes”.  It brought me to an online email support group that would become my lifeline.  With the stroke of a few keys, I “met” people from all over the world who would become my family.  I met people who knew exactly what I was dealing with and could help me to find my way.

I found mentors and friends who would be with me through the highs and the lows.  We would stay connected, meet on occasion and always been there for one another.

Through them, I would find the strength to go forward and help other people.  I would find a way to make a mark and hopefully improve the lives of other families living with diabetes.

March 17, 2000 changed our world.  It showed us the insidious nature of type 1 diabetes.  The luck of the Irish has been with us in  many ways however.  We have received  numerous gifts along this bumpy path.

Fifteen years later, my son is on the verge of graduating high school. Type 1 diabetes is just something that he has lived with for as long as he can remember. I would still give anything for him not to have to deal with this but its a part of him that he has come to accept.  March 17 is a day to celebrate the luck of the Irish, the blessing of those tricky little leprechauns, and the day that my son received his first injection of life saving insulin.

from blackberry (10)

 

 

Better the Devil I know

 
Day 5 and today’s prompt..Just like in the movie, today we’re doing a swap. If you could switch chronic diseases, which one would you choose to deal with instead of diabetes? And while we’re considering other chronic conditions, do you think your participation in the DOC has affected how you treat friends and acquaintances with other medical conditions?
This may seem weird, but I would not trade for any other chronic disease.  Each one has its challenges and struggles.  I think of people I know with asthma–they have to carry inhalers at all times and never know when an attack could strike.  They do not always occur during the day.  If an attack happened at night, would someone be there to help?
There is epilepsy.  My aunt and uncle both live with this disease.  My uncle has been seizure free for enough years now to be able to drive and live a “normal” life but the fear of never knowing when one could hit? The embarrassment they sometimes feel afterwards? No thank you.
There is celiac.  That would be easy right? Wrong.  I have considered trying a gluten free diet and then I looked at all of the “stuff” that you have to stay away from.  Its bad enough reading carb counts, watching fat and dealing with fiber and protein but looking for hidden ingredients in food? Add to that the high cost of those foods without gluten  No, I think diabetes will do. Granted with celiacs, you don’t have to carry around “stuff” but you have to be on your toes with every ingredient in every piece of food you think about eating.
Diabetes sucks. I hate dealing with it. I would love a cure but as they say “better the devil you know”! Has this devil given me a new respect for other chronic diseases? Absolutely! Before life with diabetes, I know I took things for granted.  Now when I sit down to a meal with someone and we don’t have to count the carbs or deal with bg levels, I almost feel like something is wrong! Its not normal to do that–not to test or calculate!
I better understand parents who struggle for school supports for their children.  I “get” adults who need time off work for health related issues. I hurt for those who have to struggle to get medications and medical devices paid for by insurance or public health care systems. I value my health in a new light. I appreciate each day in a way that I did not before diabetes.  We are all (usually) happy to be alive but knowing how fickle diabetes can be, brings that happiness and gratitude to a new level.
Do I attribute this empathy with the DOC? Honestly, probably not.  It comes from life experience–watching my son nearly die.  The diabetes online community has brought people into my life who have situations that have made me work harder as an advocate.  It has brought stories that keep me aware of how deadly this disease is.  Most importantly, it has brought me friends and people who also have learned greater empathy and strength because of this beast. Florida Vacation July 2007 110