YpsoPump® receives Health Canada Approval

ypsoPump Diabetes Advocacy

Ypsomed Diabetes Care recently announced that their insulin pump YpsoPump® has been approved for sale in Canada and is now available for purchase. Here are a few things that we know about the YpsoPump®.

Who is Ypsomed?

Ypsomed is a Swiss company with a long history of involvement in area of diabetes devices. twicediabetes.com states that they were behind the Disentronic insulin pumps that were available between the 1980s and early 2000s.

According to Ypsomed Diabetes Care “Ypsomed has set itself the goal of making medical self-treatment a matter of routine for people with diabetes. This is why the development team of the YpsoPump had your needs in mind. The result is an insulin pump which focuses on the essential functions and is easy to handle. It features the best of 30 years Swiss medical device engineering.”

How big is the YpsoPump®?

According to the Ypsomed Diabetes Care website, the YpsoPump® measures 7.8 cm × 4.6 cm × 1.6 cm and weighs 83 g (including battery and filled cartridge).

In comparison, the Medtronic ® 670G measures 5.3cm x 9.6cm x 2.4cm and weighs 85g.  The Tandem t:slimX2® is 7.95 cm x 5.08 cm x 1.52 cm and weighs 112g.  The OmniPod system includes the OmniPod is  4cm x 6cm x 1.8cm and weighs 34 g with a filled pod.  The PDM is 6.35cm x 11.4cm x 2.2cm and weighs 125g.

What are some of the key features of the YpsoPump®?

The YpsoPump® is marketed as an “easy to learn” insulin pump offering the “essential features”. 

Ypsopump insulin to carb screen

The features that we have seen include:

  • 4.1 × 1.6 cm, OLED touch screen that uses icons to help you navigate the insulin pump options
  • Pre-filled, 1.6mL (160 unit) glass cartridges that will last for 7 days in the insulin pump or up to 30 days if filled and kept in the refrigerator
  • Waterproof rating of IPX8 (immersion to a depth of 1 m for up to 60 minutes)
  • Bolus delivery in increments of 0.1, 0.5, 1 or 2 units
  • 2 custom basal patterns set in increments of .01 units by the hour
  • Temporary basal patterns that can be set at 0%-200% for 15 min to up 24 hours.  They must be set in 10% increments.
  • Uses one AAA alkaline battery that lasts for 30 days
  • Mylife mobile app for smartphones that sync with the YpsoPump® via Bluetooth® technology.

Mylife Mobile app

YpsoPump

The Mylife app can be downloaded for both iOS and Android. From this app you will be able to customize screens and setting for your YpsoPump®. This is also where the carb calculator and insulin on board will live. You will not find these options on the insulin pump itself.

Ypsomed log book

This app does not currently speak to the insulin pump. This means that once calculations are done on the Mylife app, they must be manually input into your insulin pump.

The Mylife app also has a great looking built-in log book. You will be able to enter data from activities as well as bg levels and carb counts in one spot to analyze.

Does it have a Continuous Glucose Monitor?

At the moment, the YpsoPump® does not work with any CGM or flash technology.  It has been suggested that Ypsomed Diabetes Care is in talks with the key players and plan to add this technology in the future.

What will the YpsoPump® cost?

The regular retail cost of this pump will be $6400. YpsoMed is currently working with all provinces to have their insulin pump added to provincial programs but at the moment, it is not covered.

YposMed’s introductory offer

The YpsoPump® pump will be offered for free to existing pumpers who apply to switch to the YpsoPump ® between July 8 and September 30th, 2019. You will be required to purchase three months supply of both insulin cartridges and infusion sets at the time of purchase. This will be in addition to the free supplies that will come with your pump start.

If your pump warranty has expired, you’ll receive a 1-year warranty on your YpsoPump ®. If your insulin pump hasn’t expired, your warranty will last until 5 years from the purchase date of your new pump. 

You can contact YposMed Canada for more details.

What does it mean for people with diabetes?

four insulin pump choices Diabetes Advocacy

Choosing an insulin pump is personal.  The pump must fit your lifestyle and your needs.  The fact that there is now a fourth option for people with insulin-dependent diabetes is wonderful. 

If you are considering insulin pump therapy or are wondering if you should change from your current insulin pump, remember to shop around. Meet with all of the insulin pump reps and find the best fit for you.  Our ebook on choosing an insulin pump can help you to figure out which features are important to you and give you ideas of questions to ask the representatives that you speak to.

Pros and Cons of using an Insulin Pump

I love insulin pump therapy.  I think that it is the best way of delivering insulin BUT it is not the only way AND it is not for everyone.  There, I said it. Insulin pump therapy is not for everyone. Some people really don’t like using an insulin pump and still have fabulous success in managing their diabetes care. Check out Ginger Vieira and Christel Oerum for great examples.

Whether you get your insulin through a pump or a pen or a syringe, it is important that you weigh out the pros and cons.  You must find the insulin delivery method that best suits your lifestyle.  

Here are a few of the pros and cons that we have come across when it comes to using an insulin pump.

The Pros of using an insulin pump

1.  Less Jabs

infusion sets

Infusion sets for insulin pumps only need to be changed every 2-4 days depending on the type of set used. While you may still require emergency site changes or an injection to bring down a stubborn high, you will still only use one or two injections vs multiple daily injections.

2. Flexibility with food

food

When using an insulin pump, you only use rapid-acting insulin.  This means that you don’t have to have snacks or meals at specific times.  Ideally, you don’t have to feed your insulin when using an insulin pump. You eat what you want, when you want to.

3.  Flexibility to exercise

exercise while pumping

You can adjust your background insulin to increase or decrease based on your anticipated activity level.  Some sensor augmented insulin pumps will even suspend your insulin delivery if your blood glucose levels are dropping too low or too rapidly.

4. Can be integrated with your CGM

cgm and pump

There is currently a category of insulin pumps that are “sensor augmented”.  This means that they can receive information from specific continuous glucose monitors.  This information is then used by the pump to help you make dosing and basal decisions.

5.  Micro-manage your blood sugars

An insulin pump allows you to make small corrections to your blood sugars.  The ability to dose fractions of a unit of insulin without injections gives you the flexibility of great control with greater ease. It allows you to tailor your insulin needs to your lifestyle rather than the other way around.

6.  Reduced episodes of severe hypoglycemia

Insulin pumps deliver small amounts of rapid insulin on a constant basis.  There is less variance in absorption rates and ultimately a reduced incidence of extreme hypoglycemia.

7. No peaks to chase

Again, because insulin pumps only use rapid acting insulin, there are no peaks of insulin that need to chased with food. 

8.  Built in dose calculator

You don’t have to do the math.  Your insulin pump will help you to figure out how much insulin you have left in your system and how much more insulin you will need to cover a meal or bring down a high bg level.

The Cons of using an insulin pump

1.  You are attached to something 24/7

insulin pump

Whether you are tethered to an insulin pump directly or just having to have a PDM nearby, you and your pump are attached…always.  There is no taking it off or leaving it behind unless you have gone back to at least some form of injection therapy.

2.  You can’t tell if the insulin has been delivered properly or not

Infusion sets can kink inside the body.  You can’t tell until your blood sugar levels start to spike for no apparent reason. 

3.  They cost a lot of money

RDSP

Not everyone has great insurance coverage.  Not every region offers public programs that pay for insulin pumps.  If you must pay for an insulin pump and then the supplies out of your own pocket, it can be a costly venture.

4.  Changing an infusion set takes more effort than an injection

To change an infusion set, you must prep the site, fill the tubing with insulin, inject the infusion set into the body, connect it to the tubing and fill the cannula, that is now under the skin, with insulin.

5.  Increased risk of DKA

An insulin pump uses only rapid acting insulin. This means that there is no background insulin in the body if there is a pump failure.  Without the background insulin, there is a greater risk of DKA.  A person using an insulin pump should be monitoring their blood glucose levels more closely and checking for blood ketones when readings begin to climb.

6.  Increased risk of infection

Because an infusion set stays in the skin for a period of 2-4 days, there can be an increased risk of infection to the sites.  Therefore, site rotation and proper skin prep is vital when using an insulin pump.

Make an educated choice

talk to an expert

 Choosing to inject or use an insulin pump should be a choice that you make based on your needs and comfort level.  Before you decide, spend time speaking with your diabetes team and take time to educate yourself.

If you decide to use an insulin pump, again, choose the insulin pump that is right for your lifestyle. To help you decide what is right for you, download our eBook. It has a checklist of features that will help you decide what is important to you.  It also has a list of questions that you can ask your pump reps before making your choice. 

Remember that all pumps come with some sort of guarantee. Ask your pump rep what their return policy is before you purchase.  Your insulin pump is a 4-5-year investment.  You don’t want to have buyers’ remorse.

10 things you need to know before shopping for an insulin pump

buying a pump

Insulin pump shopping for the first time can be exciting and daunting.  Whether you have been using insulin for years or are newly diagnosed, you have most likely heard all sorts of good…and bad things about insulin pumps.  As you begin your research to find the best insulin pump for you, you quickly find yourself in wading in a foreign language.  Let us translate some of the things you need to know when shopping for an insulin pump.

What is a basal rate?

One of the first terms that you hear is “basal rate”.  This is your background insulin.  It will replace the long-lasting insulin that you are currently using.  On injections, you inject a set amount of insulin into your body once or twice per day. 

With an insulin pump, you will set basal rates that will deliver that insulin in tiny amounts throughout the day.  These amounts can be extremely small or they can be larger depending on age, insulin sensitivity, and other factors that your diabetes team will help you with.

To give you a rough idea of what your basal needs will be, total up all of the long-acting insulin that you use in a 24-hour period.  Take that amount and divide it by 24.  This will give you a base idea of what you will require. 

A child who is only using 12 units of background insulin would need basal rates of at least .5 units per hour (and perhaps smaller).  An adult who is currently injecting 36 units per day would not be as concerned about small basal rates. Again, your exact rates will be set with the help of your diabetes team but this will help you to understand if you need to be concerned about smaller or larger rates.

What does it mean to bolus?

Another thing that you will often hear is the term “bolus”. That is the amount of insulin that is used to cover meals and correct high blood sugars.  If you have been on multiple injection therapy, this is the amount of rapid-acting insulin that you have been using.

For children, there is often a need for very small bolus amounts.  They might require .05 of a unit or less so small bolus rates are vital. In the case of teens, there can be a need for much larger bolus dosing.

Can you change the bolus delivery rate?

Large bolus dosing leads us to our next term–rate of delivery or delivery speed.  If you require larger amounts of insulin at one sitting (think pizza or pasta meal), you may prefer an insulin pump that will deliver the bolus to you at a slower speed rather than all at once.  Some people experience discomfort with large bolus amounts. 

Remember that your diabetes may vary so what is important for one person may not be a concern for another. Choice is important!

Do you want to be attached to your insulin pump 24/7?

insulin pump

Some people are okay with a tubed insulin pump.  They may even feel comforted by its presence.  Other people hate being attached to something.  You have to decide which you prefer—infusion sets and tubing or a patch insulin pump and PDM. 

How much insulin will you use over three days?

Insulin pumps require that you fill your pod/cartridge/reservoir with insulin on a regular basis. Pods currently hold 200 units of insulin. The Medtronic 670G and the Tandem t:slimX2 both hold 300 units.

Some people are okay with changing cartridges and infusion sets at different times, others want to do it at the same time. Either way, if you are using larger amounts of insulin, you may want to consider a larger insulin container.

Will you be using a continuous glucose monitor?

A Continuous Glucose Monitor or CGM is a device that constantly monitors your blood sugar levels.  If you are already using a system, you may want to know if it works with an insulin pump. Stand alone devices can be used in conjunction with the insulin pump of your choice but only specific brands “speak” to specific pumps at this time. Right now, the t:slim™X2 works with a Dexcom® system.  The 670G works with the Medtronic® Elite system.  If you are using the Libre™ Flash Monitoring system, there is currently no insulin pump that links directly to this device.

What is your body type?

infusion sets

Are you thin or do you have a bit of extra body fat? Are you athletic or pregnant? All of these questions are important when deciding on the best infusion set to use with your new insulin pump. 

Each pump company has their own names for the various infusion sets but infusion sets basically fall into three categories.  There are sites that go straight in (90-degree sites).  There are infusion sets that can be placed on an angle up to 30 degrees. Finally, there are 90-degree steel infusion sets.  Each infusion set works best with a specific body type. Make sure to discuss these options with your diabetes educator or pump trainer.

It is important to consider if you will need a certain type of infusion set before you purchase an insulin pump. Not all pumps currently allow you access to all types of infusion sets.  Because you will be wearing your site 24/7, you want to make sure that you have the most comfortable fit for your body type and lifestyle.

Are you visually impaired in any way?

The lighting of the screen and its font size can be something to consider when choosing the right insulin pump.  They can have a touch screen, a touch bolus or physical buttons that have to be pressed to deliver insulin and change settings.  It is important for you to feel comfortable with which ever option your insulin pump has.  You want to be able to view it in all lighting situations including when responding to those 3 am alarms.

Do you need to lock your pump?

Will the insulin pump be used on a small child? If so, you may want to ensure that you can lock them out of the insulin pump settings.  Buttons and touch screens are often relatively easy to use but you don’t want small children to be able to easily access their touch bolus and accidentally deliver insulin unsupervised.

What are the payment options?

If you don’t have private or public insurance coverage for your insulin pump, you will want to discuss payment options with your rep.  Do they have a payment plan? How does the plan work?

If you have insurance, will they work with your insurance company on your behalf or will you have to be the go-between?

diabetes costs

Purchasing an insulin pump is a huge decision. It is important that you understand the key feature before you begin your search. 

Diabetes Advocacy has helped to make this a little easier for you by creating a 20-page ebook with all of the above questions and more.  This downloadable document gives you things to think about before you purchase your insulin pump as well as prompts to ask your pump rep at your first meeting.

pump book

An insulin pump is a long-term commitment. You will be with your pump 24/7 for the next 4-5 years. It is important that it fits your needs and your lifestyle.

Take me to the insulin pump ebook.

It is NOT an artificial pancreas

My rant…

The media has been shouting for a while now about the new “artificial pancreas” on the market.  This is driving me crazy.  It is not an artificial pancreas. It is a new insulin pump.  This new pump has some automated features but it does not completely replace a pancreas that is not producing insulin. It does not bolus for food on its own.  It is not a cure. What this new device is is a new device! It is another tool to help people living with diabetes live a better life.  That is it!

Medtronic® does not call their latest insulin pump an artificial pancreas. They simply refer to it as “The world’s first self-adjusting insulin pump system for people with type 1 diabetes” (over 7 years of age).  That is fair.

In auto-mode, this new pump will make adjustments and suspend itself.  It uses information from the continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to predict rises and falls in blood glucose levels. The 670G (this self-adjusting insulin pump) will get your background insulin (your basal rate) under control for you.  In turn, “the sensor must be calibrated at a minimum of every 12 hours throughout the life of the sensor. For better sensor performance, it is recommended that you calibrate your sensor three or four times each day.” (page 216 of users manual).  The manual also notes that “the Auto Mode feature still requires your input for meals, calibrations, and times when you need the target value raised.” (page 231).  Again, making this is not a true “artificial pancreas” but a new tool for people with insulin-dependent diabetes.

not an artificial pancreas
It’s just a new tool!

This is great! I am seriously all for better tools.  I am also all for choice as you can read here and here.  I even have developed a tool to help you make your own choices when it comes to purchasing an insulin pump here.

Choice is vital because everyone’s diabetes is different. Children have different needs from teens. Teens have different needs from adults. One adult requires different things from an insulin pump than another does. The good news though is that more choice is coming…or in some countries it is already here.

insulin pumps

In the US, besides the Medtronic® 670G, you have the option to use the t:slim X2™ with Basal IQ™ (this option is available in countries where the t:slim X2™ is sold and the Dexcom® G6 is approved for use). This pump also has a great automated feature. 

It predicts low blood glucose levels ahead of time and stops insulin delivery.  The Basal IQ™ technology will allow the insulin pump to turn insulin delivery on and off as often as every 5 minutes.  As I noted, this system works with the Dexcom® G6 Continuous Glucose Monitor which is currently the only CGM approved for use without the need for fingerstick calibration.  

These systems have been approved for use in the US and other countries. There are other projects that are still being tested like the iLet® project out of the University of Boston.  Bigfoot Biomedical® is working on some exciting projects and patients are creating their own closed loop in the #WeAreNotWaiting projects.

The world of diabetes management tools is once again expanding at a fascinating rate. It is an exciting time.

We are not however at a time when diabetes is cured with an artificial pancreas.  No system counts carbs—although the ILet potentially will allow the pump to learn how. Every system requires you to change out infusion sets that can kink or come out of the body.  All of these systems require learning on the part of the user and the machine. 

Perhaps in another 20 years, we will see a true artificial pancreas.  Maybe in another 30 years, it will be available to everyone who needs one.  In the meantime, people with diabetes must continue to educate themselves on the various features of insulin pumps and choose the pump that best fits their lifestyle.

Download our ebook to help you find the right insulin pump for you.

Choosing an insulin pump is personal

chosing an insulin pump

Choosing an insulin pump is a very personal experience. Anyone who tells you otherwise is basically lying to you. To pump or not to pump, to go with tubing or no tubing, it is all a matter of personal preference.

When we first began looking for an insulin pump for my son it was 2002 and he was 4 years old. The only requirement he had was that it could NOT be the blue pump. Everyone he saw seemed to have a blue insulin pump and he wanted to be different. As a parent, I knew that there were other things to consider. At first, however, I wasn’t quite sure what they were.

I read books like Pumping Insulin. I reached out to the parent email list on the Children with Diabetes website. Finally, I consulted with friends and began to compile my own list of features that our insulin pump had to have.

Get our insulin pump shopping list ebook.

It was important for this to be the most up-to-date insulin pump. I was paying for this pump out of my own pocket and would have it for the next four years. I wanted the best technology for my money.

My son was only four so it had to be able to deliver very small amounts of insulin. Because we were new to pumping, certain alerts were also going to make our journey a little easier.

I didn’t order the blue pump. I didn’t order from the rep who became a lifelong friend. The other rep whom I met for coffee and answered every question I had, also did not get our business. I felt horrible not purchasing from either of these amazing people but pumping is personal. I had to go with the pump that fit us. They understood.

wearing an insulin pump

I chose a brand new insulin pump. It had everything that we wanted in a pump. It had features that he would need in the coming four years and features that were perfect for our life at that time. This was an insulin pump that was ideal for our family.

Let me repeat that…it was ideal for our family. It was not ideal for everyone’s family. This was a pump that was not ideal for every person with diabetes. That is the thing with insulin pumps and with diabetes in general…everyone is different. Everyone’s needs, wants, and budgets are different. The technology has to fit the person.

If you are looking at an insulin pump for the very first time, here are five things to consider…

insulin pumps

1. Do you want tubing or not?

For some people, being attached to something 24/7 can be overwhelming. This might mean that an insulin pump is not for them. It may also mean that they might be better suited to a pump that has no tubing like the Omnipod. Other people find that having a pump at the end of their tubing allows them to know where their “pancreas” is at all times and gives them peace of mind.

2. Is a Continuous Glucose Monitor important to you?

Do you need a continuous glucose monitor with your insulin pump? Are you already using one? Do you want a pump that “talks” to your CGM? Do you prefer the Flash Meter system?

There are some insulin pumps with CGMs built into them. This can be a pro or a con depending on how you look at it. It is great to not have to be concerned about carrying or dealing with another device but technology is changing so rapidly that it can be nice to have a stand-alone device that is more updated than the one integrated into your pump.

3. Does it update itself?

As I said, for me it was vital to have to most uptodate technology. My thinking was that if I was spending that kind of money, why did I want a Kia when I could get a Cadillac for the same price?

Insulin pumps are constantly changing. New models are being brought to the FDA and Health Canada on a regular basis for approval. Some people, like me, want the most advanced technology for their money. Other people are okay with any insulin pump as long as it delivers insulin. Again, an insulin pump is a personal choice.

Currently, in the Canadian and US markets, there is only one insulin pump company that offers upgrades without having to purchase a new insulin pump. A Tandem insulin pump has the capability to remotely update its software without the need to purchase an entirely new device.

4. How much insulin do you need?

The reservoir or insulin cartridge is what will hold the insulin in your pump. Depending on your age and needs, size can make a huge difference.

Teens for example, tend to go through a lot of insulin. An insulin pump with a 2mL(200 unit) cartridge will not last them nearly as long as a 3mL (300 unit) cartridge. Changing the reservoir takes time out of your day and that can be annoying to some. If you hate changing out your insulin reservoir, this might be something that you have to think about.

Also, depending on your age and lifestyle, basal rates and bolus amounts are important. The basal rate is the amount of background insulin that your pump is delivering to you every hour. Each pump delivers that background insulin differently and has different maximum and minimum amounts.

To get a rough idea of how much background insulin you might need, look at the amount of long-acting insulin you are currently using and divide it by 24. This is a very rough guess and will change with an insulin pump but it will tell you if you need smaller or larger basal rates.

Bolus amounts are the amount of insulin that you will inject (or bolus) to cover your meals. If you are a big eater or you have a high carbohydrate to insulin ratio, you are going to want a pump that can handle that. If you are someone who is very sensitive to insulin, then small, precise bolus amounts will be very important to you.

5. What sort of alerts will you need?

Will you remember when to do an infusion set change? Do you need a reminder to let you know if you forgot to take insulin to cover a meal? Is it important to you to have an alert that lets you know if you are dropping low or spiking during the day?

These are just some of the alerts that are found on some of the insulin pumps currently on the North American market. When searching for an insulin pump, take a look at the alerts and see which ones you will use and which ones you can do without.

Choosing an insulin pump can be overwhelming. Make a list of what you require in an insulin pump. Think about the five key things I mentioned above. Add your own features that you feel are important like screen size and temporary basal patterns.

Once you have your list (we have a great checklist of features here), contact your local insulin pump reps. Contact all of them, not just the one from the pump company that you know the most about or the one that you are leaning towards. Get to know them. Get a feel for how they treat you. Learn about their payment plans and customer service. Will they let you try out the pump?

Make sure that you choose the pump that is the right fit for you. You are the one who will have to deal with it 24/7 for the next 4-5 years, no one else.

Get our questions to ask your pump rep.

Tandem® t:slim X2™ is approved for use in Canada and we’re stoked

t:slimX2 approved for canada

Tandem® t:slim X2™ insulin pump has been approved for sale in Canada and I am excited.  I know that this pump is not for everyone but for us…well, we have been waiting since it was first brought to the US market.

We were Cozmo users.  Actually Cozmo lovers.  Any pump after our beloved Cozmo was just not the same.  So many features were missing. It felt like we were going back in time.

When the Tandem® t:slim™ insulin pump first came out in the US, I was jealous.  Many of our fellow Cozmo pumpers made the switch and were in love.  It wasn’t perfect. Some people have issues with certain features but overall most of them felt that one or two annoyances (some of which the company is working to change) were more than worth it.

Let’s face it, this pump looks cool. It has an iPhone phone look.  It also has some features that we have been missing and others that we are excited to see.

Here are a few of the features that the Tandem® t:slim X2™ have to offer Canadian insulin pumpers.

t:slim X2™ Features:

  • the smaller insulin pump than Medtronic 670G or Omnipod
  • has a 300 unit reservoir
  • does not use batteries but rather is recharged when you plug a USB cable into a regular AC current. You can go approximately 7 days between charges.
  • has a shatterproof, touchscreen
  • Dexcom integrated
  • Bolus by gram of carbs or units of insulin
  • Quick bolus option
  • Integrated calculator with numeric keypad
  •  6 personalized delivery profiles
  • 16 timed insulin delivery settings
  • Site change reminders
  • High and low blood glucose alerts
  • Missed meal bolus alerts
  • Remotely update software (no need to buy an entirely new pump!)
  • Waterproof for up to 3m for 30 minutes

For us, these are features that are worth getting excited about!  You can download the simulator app for Apple or Android and test drive this pump before you purchase.

Now that we have shown you why we love this new pump, I am curious, what features are most important for you when choosing an insulin pump?  If you aren’t sure, download our ebooklet. It has a list of features that may or may not be important to you as well as questions to ask pump reps when you meet!

Learn more about choosing the perfect insulin pump for you in our insulin pump ebooklet.

How to reduce diabetes waste

Whenever we have changed a site or try out a sensor, I have looked down at the pile of trash and feel incredible guilt. There seems to be so much “stuff” that we are putting in the garbage can. It can’t possibly be good for the environment. In an attempt to protect the world for my future grandchildren, I searched for some way to reduce our diabetes waste.  Here is what I found.

Buy in bulk

If you are purchasing those travel sized packages of glucose tablets, you may want to consider buying the larger bottles.  You can also go to your local Bulk Barn or Walmart and purchase low blood sugar treats in bulk.  If you do this right after Halloween, you can usually score even more treats at a way lower price!

Once you get your glucose tablets or other low treats home, you can then break them down into properly portioned, travel sizes in reusable containers. Those old glucose tablet bottles can be great for this.

Recycle the cardboard

recycle your diabetes packaging

Test strips come in boxes. Insulin comes in boxes. Infusion sets come in boxes. You get the idea. There are a lot of boxes when you live with diabetes. The great news is that most boxes and paper inserts are recyclable. Simply break them down and place them in your cardboard recycling container.

Drop off electronic diabetes devices for recycling

recycle your electronic diabetes waste

Did you know that often your old glucometer and DexCom can be returned to a recycling depot? I didn’t! You no longer have to have a dead meter collection in your drawer because you worried about throwing them in the trash.  Most will be accepted by your local e-waste or e-cycling drop-off center.  If you aren’t sure of a location in your area, you can also go to Earth911.com for the nearest recycling location.

Reuse tubing and other “waste” materials

reuse to reduce diabetes waste

If you are using an insulin pump, you already have come up with some great ways to reuse your tubing.  Young children love it when you snip the ends off of infusion set tubing and then let them string beads. They can spend hours making cute bracelets and more!

If you don’t have littles around, don’t worry, for those of you who like to garden, tubing is perfect for holding up plants!

Test strip bottle and insulin vials have many uses in creative art projects. Test strip bottles can also be perfect storage containers for thumb-tacks and other small items. Think about all of those things that you used to store in film containers and now you can put them in test strip bottles!

Recycle some of your diabetes waste products

recycle to reduce diabetes waste

After a bit of investigating, I did find that some diabetes supplies can be put in your household recycling bins.

Syringe caps can be recycled in areas that recycle bottle caps. The tops of the built-in inserters on inset®, insetII®s, mio®, Mio30®, Autosoft90® and Autosoft30® can also be recycled. Please ensure proper disposal of the insertion needles, however. If you use an OmniPod, you can take part in the Eco-pod program. It allows you to return pods to Diabetes Express for recycling.

If you are like me, you may still feel like there is a lot of waste in diabetes care but I was surprised to read a study that showed that there may not be as much as we think. A person consuming one soft drink or one beer in a can only every three days has a similar impact on the environment as eleven insulin pump patients using one infusion set each in the same time period. Let me repeat that….one beverage can every three days creates the same amount of waste as eleven pumpers who use one infusion set each!

A person using a tubed insulin pump in fact only produces the same amount of environmental waste as a person who purchases one cup of coffee per day. Mind-blowing.

As great as that makes me feel, by using the tips above, we can further reduce the environmental impact of diabetes waste.

What else do you do to reduce your diabetes waste?

How to manage airport security with an insulin pump and CGM

insulin pumps

In May of 2012, after reading about a friend having problems getting their insulin pump through security at a US airport, I did some research on the subject

Should you put your pump through the x-ray machine? Can you wear your CGM through a full-body scanner? There were a lot of questions in 2012 and there still are in 2018 so I reached out to a few friends in the industry to see if things have changed at all.  Here is what you need to know when you are traveling with an insulin pump or CGM

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Air travel with a Dexcom® G5 or G6

The Dexcom® G5 and G6 is cleared to take through metal detectors, be hand-wanded and be worn during flights. Make sure to let the Security Officer know the sensor can’t be removed because it’s inserted under the skin.

There are a few situations to be concerned about.

NEVER put your receiver or extra sensors for the Dexcom® G5 or G6 through an x-ray machine.  Ask the security personnel to do a hand-check of the items to avoid permanent damage of these devices.

According to Dexcom®, the effects of full body scanners on CGM components have not been studied. It is therefore recommended that you do not take your Dexcom® through one.

Once you are through security and on your plane waiting for takeoff, make sure to set your app to airplane mode, keeping the bluetooth on and leave your receiver turned on.

Flying with a FreeStyle Libre

The Dream Big Travel Far blog contacted the people at FreeStyle and asked what the guidelines were for air travel with the Libre.  This is what they reported.

“We recommend the user notify security personnel when going through airport security screening. the user can go through X-ray machines while wearing a sensor. We recommend the reader be powered off during a flight and not used for scanning a sensor. However, the strip port on the reader can be used to take blood glucose or ketone readings during flight. Turning on the reader with the Home Button will activate the radio. The user must turn on the reader by inserting a test strip so as to not activate the radio.”

Air travel wearing an Omnipod

Good news for Omnipod users! You can wear the pod through the metal detector, x-ray machines and full body scanners with no worry.  The PDM can also go through the X-ray. Insulet does recommend that if you are selected for a “pat down” you disclose that you are wearing the pod.

Flying with a Medtronic® insulin pump

Medtronic® insulin pumps can be worn through metal detectors and be wanded.  They should NOT be sent through x-ray machines however.

Medtronic® also notes that your sensor and transmitter must be removed if you are going through a full-body scanner. If you do not want to remove your sensor, you can ask to be pat down instead.

Flying with a Tandem® t:slim X2™ insulin pump

Tandem® t:slim X2™ can be worn through metal detectors and can be wanded.  They should not be sent through x-ray machines.

Changes in air pressure cause bubbles to form in insulin, and the related expansion can cause unintentional insulin delivery.  This is NOT a problem in the Tandem pump.

The pumping mechanism used in Tandem pumps isolates the insulin reservoir (bag) from the user line, so if bubbles are formed in the cartridge due to pressure changes, the internal bag will expand, but no insulin will be delivered to the user from the reservoir.  The only volume in line with the user at any given time is the insulin in their infusion set and cartridge tubing, and the contents of the 0.3 unit Micro-Delivery chamber.

There is no need to turn off your t:slim X2™ during takeoff or landing.  This system runs on Bluetooth which can operate during flights. If you are also using a Dexcom CGM that you are viewing with your smartphone, turn the phone on airplane mode and then turn on Bluetooth.

Flying if you wear an Animas® insulin pump

A detailed list of where you can and cannot wear your Animas® pump can be found in my May 2012 post.

Animas® insulin pumps can be worn through metal detectors and can be wanded.  They should NOT be sent through x-ray machines.

Animas® pumps should not be worn through full-body scanners.

Click here for more tips on traveling with diabetes!

Animas, We are Heartbroken

Animas is closing

Johnson and Johnson announced on September 5th of 2017  that they were closing the doors on their insulin pump division in Canada and the US.  Animas Insulin Pumps would be no more. Animas insulin pumpers in North America were heartbroken.

While some saw it coming in the corporate rumour mill, others were blindsided.

Animas had done something that many companies in many industries are striving to do…they had  created a feeling that you were family.  Whether you were an Animas insulin pumper or you used another brand, you had probably attended an Animas event and were treated royally.

The employees with Animas all seemed to genuinely care about you.  They checked in on you and took the time to know your family.  I had the pleasure to work closely with many members of the Animas family over the years.  They will be huge assets for the next company that employs them. I am sure that many of them are just as saddened as we are.

This is not the first time that an insulin pump company has closed its doors.  We have been here before…twice.

Cozmo (personally a pump like no other) closed its doors in 2009.  We still have two in my son’s closet.  I have friends who still wear this as their pump of choice.  It is doable even 8 years later.

Most recently, Asante, a pump revered by many who tried it,  was also forced to step away from the insulin pump market.  Their users were devastated.  They were heartbroken and felt lost–just like Animas insulin pumpers are feeling today.

What do I do next?

Take things one step at a time.  The great thing about insulin pumps is that, while some have quirks, many are pretty sturdy and last.  If you have more than one pump in your house–usually because one was out of warranty and you purchased a new one right away “just in case”, relax.  If for some reason, your current pump stops functioning, go back on your old one while you decide which pump to try next! Just make sure to write down those settings and keep them in a safe place.

How long do I have before I can’t get supplies?

You don’t have  to stockpile supplies   You don’t have to run out and buy a new insulin pump tomorrow.  The Animas press release stated that warranties will continue to be honoured until September 2019. Cartridges will be be available until that date as well.

Statements from both Animas and Medtronic note that supplies will still be able to be ordered in the same way as before. Nothing changes, except when your Animas pump stops working, you will not be able to purchase a new one.

Thank you…

So while we take a breath and rethink our next steps…our next pump…our next option, I want to take a moment and say thank you.  Thank you to the men and women who worked so hard to make Animas a different company.  I truly appreciated getting to know so many of you.  You brought us a new experience in caring.  I hope that we meet again soon, with a new company perhaps bringing new options in diabetes care.

Options are the most important thing.  Make sure to always know your options and always choose the option that works best for you and your lifestyle.

My Dario…A new toy!

my Dario glucometer
Dario diabetes management tool

A month or so ago, I came across this really interesting looking glucometer.  I sent my son the link and asked, “What do you think?”  His response was, “I need one. You should get me one.”

I laughed. I don’t exactly have the power to get him every new meter that comes out as easily as I once did.  Back in our earlier years of diabetes management, glucometers were pretty basic.  Asking a rep for a new glucometer was not a big deal because they wanted your test strip business.  Today many meters are small computers.  They analyze trends and do all sorts of tricks.  This means that they cost a lot more money than they once did.

Cost or not, a new meter in our little world of diabetes has always been a big deal. Needless to say, I was really excited when I received the press release from Auto Control Medical stating that they were launching the meter that we had looked at!  Auto Control was the distributor for many great diabetes tools like the Cozmo insulin pump and the Cleo infusion set. It was therefore not surprising to see them involved with another cool innovation.

After a few emails, I was able to set up a time to chat with a representative from Auto Control and get the details on this new toy Dario glucometer.

The Dario Glucometer Press Release

Dario glucometer
Compact system with meter, lancing device and strips all in one spot

According to the press release, “the Dario Diabetes Management Solution is a compact all-in-one system that helps people with diabetes monitor blood sugar levels and proactively manage their disease using their smartphone or tablet…Approved by Health Canada, Dario connects via headphone jack to turn a mobile device into a glucose monitor, and comes equipped with a lancing device and test strips to take blood samples on the spot. It provides the diabetes patient’s real-time and historical blood glucose data to spot patterns, recommend treatments and support behavior changes. Its web interface also makes it easy to get upgrades and share health information with healthcare providers and loved ones.”

“As an all-in-one system, Dario combines a lancing device to obtain a blood sample, a proprietary disposable test strip cartridge with 25 strips, and a glucose meter that’s driven via the user’s mobile device. Unlike conventional glucose monitors, there is no carrying case or batteries to replace, and the system works on both Apple and Android devices.” You can see why I was excited about this new technology!

We needed to buy this glucometer

After speaking with the Auto Control representative, my enthusiasm didn’t wane.  Not only was this meter compact, like my son’s beloved iBgStar, but it would not become obsolete or require me to search high and low for new adapters when he upgraded his cellphone.  Dario’s patented technology allows the user to plug the meter into the phone jack and you are good to go!

The Dario glucometer offers data sharing (great for nosy parents like me!). It is extremely feature rich according to Auto Control.  I was told that app updates will make this meter much more customizable than the competition.

By updating software through apps, the meter should also have more longevity and not become obsolete before you have finished the first 100 test strips.  I haven’t had a chance yet to download the myDario apps yet but I was told that users are free to download and play even before purchasing the meter.

Yes, you do have to purchase the meter but again, the meter is less than some comparable products.  The current retail price is $39.95 but some short-term offerings are being made to help reduce the cost.  Please check with your pharmacy or www.mydario.ca for the exact details.

What you get with the Dario diabetes management tool

The Dario diabetes management tool has a meter, lancing device and 25 strip container in one small location. It uploads to most smartphones and offers detailed carb counting applications similar to those found on some smart insulin pumps. It has a standard warranty program and offers replacements on a case by case basis.   The meter and test strips are covered by most private insurance companies. It will be added to provincial formularies in the coming months.

The next step for us will be to test it out in the real world.  My son got his wish and will be having a Dario glucometer delivered to him in the coming weeks.  I have told him that I want a full review from him on what he thinks about this new meter.  We will also be downloading the app from the MyDario site and seeing what I think of things from that end.  New diabetes toys are such fun!

Are you considering a new insulin pump to go with your new glucometer? Our insulin pump ebooklet has great tips and things to ask your pump rep when you meet.